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Moving to Massachusetts:
Part 1

  1. Planning Your Move
  2. Moving With Pets
  3. Moving Day Parking Restrictions
  4. Change of Address
  5. Establishing Residency
  6. Visas

Part 2

  1. Converting an Out-Of-State Driver’s License
  2. Converting a Driver’s License From a Foreign Country
  3. Changing a Massachusetts Driver’s License or ID Address
  4. Converting an Out-Of-State Vehicle Registration
  5. Bringing Leased Vehicles to Massachusetts

Part 3

  1. Employment
  2. Education
  3. Health Care Coverage
  4. Automobile Insurance
  5. Taxes

 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts welcomes new residents to enjoy all the state has to offer. Because moving to a new state can be both exciting and stressful, the following tips for newcomers aim to make your relocation to the Bay State as smooth as possible.

Planning Your Move

Figuring out the details of your move in advance will help reduce stress on moving day. Research reputable movers and select the service that best suits your needs. Be sure that any moving company you contact to move from one town to another within Massachusetts has an up-to-date operating license issued by the Massachusetts Department of Public Utilities (DPU).

If you’re moving from another state, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) has jurisdiction over the mover, not the DPU. You can contact the FMCSA with any questions at 888-368-7238.

Moving with Pets

Be aware of any requirements and regulations that may affect you and your pet(s). Depending on the animal(s), the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service may impose restrictions if you are moving to the U.S. from a different country. Additionally, make sure your pets are comfortable traveling and get a kennel or crate with appropriate space for transporting them. Pets should also have identification tags with up-to-date information or be microchipped for tracking purposes, in case of emergency.

Moving Day Parking Restrictions

Parking restrictions may be an issue when unloading vehicles in an urban area. If available, moving permits should be obtained far in advance. Consult your city or townfor specific information on the permitting process.

Change of Address

The U.S. Postal Service now allows residents to file an official change of address form online.

In addition, you may need to file a change of address for your state license or ID. The Massachusetts Registry of Motor Vehicles (RMV) requires residents to report updates by completing their change of address form. This form covers in-state address changes only, newcomers moving from out-of-state must first convert their license.

Establishing Residency

Individuals are considered full-year residents if they reside in Massachusetts for the full calendar year. They must have a “permanent place of abode” – a residence continually maintained by a person, whether or not owned by such person. This can include a dwelling owned or leased by a person’s spouse. Restrictions apply, and places such as military barracks or university-owned apartments are not considered permanent residences.

Visas

International visitors or ex-pats typically require visas if they stay in the United States for an extended period of time. The most common types of visas are:

  • F-1 student visas – Generally given to those who come to the U.S. as students to pursue a course of study at an established institution of learning;
  • H-1 work visas – Generally given to those who come to the U.S. to work;
  • J-1 teaching visas – Generally given to those who come to the U.S. as exchange visitors to participate in authorized programs as teachers, scholars, research assistants, trainers, etc.;
  • M-1 visas – Generally given to those who come to the U.S. as vocational or other nonacademic students; and,
  • Q-1 visas – Generally given to those who come to the U.S. as international cultural exchange visitors.

For more information, the U.S. Department of State provides a directory of visa categories with links to specific individual requirements.

Planning your move to the Bay State will facilitate your relocation, whether across town or across the country.  Make sure you’ve done your research and have accounted for the needs of all those who are moving, from children to pets. Welcome to Massachusetts!

What are your moving tips while planning for the big day? Share them with us in the comments below, or tweet us @MassGov.

Read more in our “Moving to Massachusetts” blog series:

Part 2 – Driver’s Licenses and Motor Vehicle Registration

Part 3 - Employment, Education, Insurance, and Taxes

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