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Massachusetts welcome signThe Commonwealth of Massachusetts welcomes new residents to enjoy all the state has to offer. To help make your move to the Bay State as smooth as possible, this three-part blog series provides instructions for changing your license, tips for settling in, and other useful information.

This section will outline buying or renting a home, moving from a foreign country, what to do on moving day, moving with pets, and changing your address.

Buying or Renting a Home in Massachusetts

If you are renting a home or an apartment, the Office of Consumer Affairs & Business Regulation (OCABR) emphasizes the importance of knowing your tenant rights and responsibilities, such as:

  • Protection from unlawful discrimination
  • Rental agreements for leases and tenancy-at-will
  • Rent withholding and deductions for repairs
  • Lease termination, eviction, and moving out

If you will be buying a home in Massachusetts, make sure you consider all the steps you will need to take, whether or not you’re a first-time home buyer.

Moving From a Foreign Country

According to the U.S. Department of State (DOS), most citizens of foreign countries must obtain a U.S. visa when moving to the United States. There are different types of visitor visas and immigrant visas.

The DOS provides a complete directory of visa categories and a Visa Wizard to help foreign citizens determine whether or not they will need a visa.

Moving Day

Follow these tips to ease your move on the big day:

Moving with Pets

Be aware of any regulations that may affect moving with a pet, and keep these guidelines in mind as you plan your move:

Changing Your Address

You may need to file a change of address with federal agencies depending on your needs. Newcomers can file a change of address form online through the U.S. Postal Service (USPS) to have mail forwarded to their new home.

Once Massachusetts residency has been established, new residents are required to have a Massachusetts driver’s license to operate a vehicle. There is no grace period. If you do not drive, a Massachusetts ID can serve as proof of residency and identity.

Whether you’re moving from another state or country, planning your move will help make your relocation easier. Read on to Part 2:  Driver’s Licenses and Motor Vehicle Registration to learn how to convert your license and register your car. Check out Part 3: Settling In for more information on moving to the Bay State. Welcome to Massachusetts!

Share your tips on moving to Massachusetts by commenting below or tweeting us @MassGov.

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