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A Family Spending The Day Ice-Skating Outdoors

Ice skating is a perfect way to get children and adults to sneak some physical activity into their winter routines. Race, spin, slide, and socialize to a healthier lifestyle while having tremendous fun. The good news is that Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR) ice skating rinks open to the public on Wednesday, November 27. So it’s time to sharpen those skates, shine those boots, and glide across the ice at one of DCR’s facilities. Many locations offer skate rentals and some rinks have concession stands where a hot cup of cocoa can make up for any time spent falling on the ice.

Ice skating is a fun winter activity for people of all ages and abilities, and through DCR’s Universal Access Program ice skating is available to everyone. 17 DCR rinks offer accessible skating where seated ice skating sleds enable people with disabilities to join other skaters in the merriment. Some sleds are equipped with a stroller bar so another skater can push; some have short hockey sticks with picks that enable users to propel themselves as fast as they want across the rink.

Ice Skating Tips

  • Try to always skate with at least one other person.
  • The recommended thickness for ice skating on ponds is six inches.
  • Remove loose objects from ice surfaces to avoid them freezing into the ice and creating a hazard.
  • Well-lit areas are the best places to skate safely.
  • Hockey players should be careful skating near young children so as to not run into them and knock them over.
  • Make sure to check with your local rink to see if hockey is allowed.
  • For the safety of all skaters, follow the rules posted on signs located at each pond and rink.

Where is your favorite ice skating rink in Massachusetts? Why is it fun? Is it the size of the rink, or the shape? The people who go there? Let us know in the comments below or by tweeting us at @MassGov.

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