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The smell of cookies baking in the oven or tasty sauces simmering on the stovetop is hard to resist for adults and children alike. However, before you dip your finger into the pot to taste that delicious soup, know that scalds from cooking liquids, grease, and food, as well as tap water and steam were responsible for 46 percent of all burns in 2012. Of these, 53 percent of the victims were children under five and most of these burns occurred in the home – usually in the kitchen or bathroom.

Scalds are the most common burn injury among young children and one of the leading causes of accidental death in the home for children under age four. U.S. hospitals treat an estimated 110,000 people under 19 for scalds every year.

While thousands of scald burns occur annually, increased awareness of the dangers can prevent injuries. To help people be mindful of scald burns, the American Burn Association has declared the first week of February National Burn Awareness Week.

Following a few simple precautions will help keep you and your little chef safe from potential burns:

  1. Cool a burn under cold running water for 10-15 minutes and call 9-1-1 for serious burns.
  2. Always supervise children in the kitchen and dining areas.
  3. Create a “No Child Zone” while preparing and serving hot foods and beverages.
  4. Don’t carry or hold a child while cooking on the stove. Instead, place the child into a high chair or other safe area while cooking.
  5. Children love to reach, so to prevent hot food or liquid spills, simply use the back burner of your stove and turn pot handles away from its edge; also, keep hot foods away from the edge of your counters.
  6. Keep clothing from coming in contact with flames or heating elements.
  7. A small adjustment to your water heater can give you one less thing to worry about. To prevent accidental scalding, set your water heater to 120 degrees Fahrenheit or the manufacturer’s recommended setting.
  8. Make a habit of placing matches, gasoline, and lighters in a safe place out of children’s reach and avoid novelty lighters as they may look like toys in a child’s eyes.
  9. When filling the bathtub turn on cold water first then mix in warmer water carefully.

In addition to these tips, the Massachusetts Department of Fire Services (DFS) offers a pamphlet on general burn safety,  as well as information on creating and practicing home fire drills, smoke alarm safety, and cooking fires.

National Burn Awareness Week is the perfect time to share this information, develop a home fire drill, check your smoke alarms, and to make your kitchen safe for your little chef in training.

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