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Keeping children safe is a priority of parenting and many jobs involving youth care and services. While the bumps, bruises, and scrapes any curious child typically receives are unavoidable,  there are instances of larger danger you can help prevent.

From September 1 – 7, National Childhood Injury Prevention Week aims to highlight ways in which a parent or caregiver can protect children from serious harm in everyday environments.

Home Safety

Carrying out best practices in home safety for infants and young children is important. Kitchens and bathrooms can often be the site of unfortunate accidents unless they are properly “childproofed.” Look at each room from a child’s eye level, and always be sure to keep medicine, cleaners, small and sharp objects, and other potentially dangerous items out of a child’s reach.

Window Safety

Each year, nearly 5,200 children fall out of windows in the United States. Remember to keep all unopened windows locked, and make sure there are no chairs or other furniture near open windows that your child could climb on. Engage young children in discussions about window safety and consider keeping a window safety checklist for everyday use.

Playground Safety

Kids love having fun outdoors, but there are important playground safety practices to abide by. Always keep an eye on your child while they’re at play and familiarize yourself with tips for staying safe on the playground. Teach children that pushing, shoving, tripping, or crowding others while on the playground can be dangerous.

First Aid

First aid and CPR skills are crucial to have in case of an emergency. Take the time to learn these important procedures to prevent accidents and injuries from becoming worse.

Child Passenger Safety

There are many precautions to take when driving a vehicle to ensure child passenger safety. Learn about positioning, selecting, and replacing a child’s passenger safety seat, and you could help save a life.

Water Safety

With the final weeks of summer upon us, learn about water safety for children. Even if children have completed swimming classes, it is important to practice water and pool safety by providing constant supervision, putting up safety barriers such as pool fencing, and selecting public pools and beaches with lifeguards, whenever possible.

Children can be a handful, but they are our most precious responsibility. While it is impossible to avoid  every minor scrape or even the threat of larger accidents, you can help prevent injury with these best practices and remain prepared for those worst case scenarios.

Have questions? Tweet us @MassGov for more information on preventing childhood injuries.   

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