Post Content

telephone-310544_960_720

When buying landline telephone service for your home, you should be aware of several issues, including technological changes impacting the communications network, and ask questions to make sure you are getting the type of telephone service that best meets your needs.

Telephone calls are generally categorized as:

  • Local: Calls made within your immediate area as determined by the exchanges (area codes) in the calling plan and the service provider you choose. It is possible that calls in your own municipality may not be considered local. Be sure to ask or request a list of the exchanges that are part of your local calling plan;
  • Regional: Calls made outside the “local” calling area; and
  • Long Distance: Calls generally made out-of-state.

Always contact your service provider of choice to inquire about their service offerings and available calling plans. You can choose one provider for all your calling needs, or you can select different providers for different types of calls. Federal Law allows you to keep your current phone number when you change providers as long as you remain within the local exchange. When switching providers be sure to tell your provider you want to keep your existing phone number.

 

Slamming and Cramming

Your phone service may be exposed to scams known as slamming or cramming. Slamming occurs when a customer’s phone service is illegally switched from one provider to another without the customer’s authorization. Long-distance service and local service are both targets of slamming. Cramming occurs when your bill includes charges for services you did not authorize. Check your bill each month to make sure it is accurate. If your bill has charges that you did not authorize, contact your provider and the Massachusetts Department of Telecommunications and Cable (DTC).

The DTC regulates the telecommunications and cable industries in Massachusetts. As part of its responsibilities, the DTC’s Consumer Division works to resolve disputes that arise between consumers and their telephone or cable service provider.  The Division offers a series of outreach programs to help educate consumers about these industries, and empower them to make smart decisions when evaluating their needs for purchasing these services. For more information or for help with a complaint about your telephone provider, contact the Massachusetts Department of Telecommunications and Cable.

 

If you have additional questions, contact the Office of Consumer Affairs and Business Regulation by calling our Consumer Hotline at (617) 973-8787, or toll-free in MA at (888) 283-3757, Monday through Friday, from 9 am-4:30 pm. Follow the Office on Facebook and Twitter, @Mass_Consumer. The Baker-Polito Administration’s Office of Consumer Affairs and Business Regulation along with its five agencies work together to achieve two goals: to protect and empower consumers through advocacy and education, and to ensure a fair playing field for all Massachusetts businesses. The Office also oversees the State’s lemon laws, data breach reporting, and home improvement contractor programs, and the State’s Do Not Call Registry.

Written By:

Recent Posts

Natural Disaster Preparation posted on Sep 19

Natural Disaster Preparation

A natural disaster or severe weather event can strike at any time, that’s why it’s imperative for consumers to be prepared. The Office of Consumer Affairs and Business Regulation and the Division of Insurance offer the following tips for preparation and your safety after a   …Continue Reading Natural Disaster Preparation

We’re Moving! posted on Sep 12

The Office of Consumer Affairs and Business Regulation will be moving this Friday, Sept. 15, 2017. If you have any questions or concerns, here’s where we’ll be next week!   Office of Consumer Affairs and Business Regulation 501 Boylston St., Suite 5100, Boston, MA 02116   …Continue Reading We’re Moving!

Equifax Breach posted on Sep 12

Equifax Breach

On September 7th, credit monitoring company Equifax announced that a breach of their system exposed names, social security numbers, birth dates, and other data for approximately 143 million Americans – that’s about half of the U.S. adult population. In Massachusetts, 2,929,675 residents were affected. Equifax   …Continue Reading Equifax Breach