Post Content

Couple looking at Coats

On Earth Day many consumers look for ways to be greener, such using less water, shopping with reusable bags or donating to environmental organizations.

Another way that consumers have been trying to be more ecologically friendly concerns their fashion choices.  The average American throws out 80 pounds of clothes each year, so here are some tips for looking your best while doing your best for the planet!

Update your look! Change up your wardrobe by challenging yourself to wear the things you already have and reinvent your outfits with accessories. Try new style ideas, such as distressing your jean hems or mixing prints. The internet has several videos and pictures for inspiration.

Clean your closet while being environmentally conscious. If you do have to clean out your closet, consider hosting a clothing swap with your friends! This can be a fun way to refresh your closet and have a fun time trying on new threads with your friends! Of course, donating to a second-hand thrift store is also a great and convenient option. If you want to make a little cash on the side, you can sell your clothes or donate your clothes at certain stores discounts. Scour apps that allow users to sell directly to other users and look for stores will accept older styles in exchange for a few dollars off of a new item.

Shop sustainable. Many companies are trying to become more eco-friendly with “conscious” collections that are claim to be more ecologically friendly. When shopping, there are several apps that rank clothing brands based on their environmental impact and the ethics of their animal and labor practices. Do some digging on the most reputable apps and eco-certifications that align closest to your values. Some of the more well-known environmental certifications include the Better Cotton Initiative, Fair Trade, Global Organic Textile Standard, Bluesign, and the Carbon Trust.

Some online retailers also allow consumers to rent or sample designer clothes at a fraction of the price and promote a sharing fashion economy. When buying new pieces, make an investment into the quality and longevity of what you’re buying. Think to yourself “Will I wear this 30 times or more?” Asking yourself these kinds of questions can end a culture of buying a cheap outfit and only wearing it once.

There are many resources available to make your shopping more sustainable for both your wallet and the planet.

For more information about going green this Earth Day, visit https://www.earthday.org. You can also read our blogs on post-consumer waste and tips for reducing your junk mail.

The Baker-Polito Administration’s Office of Consumer Affairs and Business Regulation along with its five agencies work together to achieve two goals: to protect and empower consumers through advocacy and education, and to ensure a fair playing field for Massachusetts businesses. The Office also oversees the state’s vehicular and customized wheelchair Lemon Laws and Arbitration Programs, Data Breach reporting, Home Improvement Contractor Programs and the MA Do Not Call Registry. You can contact the Office of Consumer Affairs and Business Regulation by calling our Consumer Hotline at (617) 973-8787, or toll-free in MA at (888) 283-3757, Monday through Friday, from 9 am-4:30 pm. Follow the Office on Facebook and Twitter, @Mass_Consumer.

Written By:

Recent Posts

What to Do If You Buy a Car That is a Lemon posted on May 21

What to Do If You Buy a Car That is a Lemon

Roadways are seeing a lot less traffic these days as businesses remain shuttered and much of the state is adhering to the stay-at-home policy initiated by Governor Baker’s state of emergency. Just the same, people have continued to shop for and purchase cars during the   …Continue Reading What to Do If You Buy a Car That is a Lemon

Show Me the Money posted on May 7

Show Me the Money

On March 25th President Donald Trump signed a $2.2 trillion coronavirus stimulus package which included an emergency universal income payment of $1,200 for most Americans who earn under $75,000 a year. The IRS will make prorated payments to those making up to $99,000 a year.   …Continue Reading Show Me the Money

Suiting Up to Protect Essential Workers and the Public posted on May 1

Suiting Up to Protect Essential Workers and the Public

Dressing for work has taken on a whole new meaning in the time of a global pandemic. Where it once would have been considered inappropriate to show up in public with your face covered, the opposite is now true especially for the Massachusetts’ essential workers   …Continue Reading Suiting Up to Protect Essential Workers and the Public