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In economic conditions like we’re seeing now, some unscrupulous people take advantage of a family’s need to save money. They offer “deals” that appear to be a money-saving solution.  A very low rate might seem like a bargain, but there may be no benefits – even basic coverage – if the company is a fake or dishonest agent takes the money and runs.

In many cases, this is an example of “What seems too good to be true often is.” Phony home, health, life and auto insurance policies are typically offered at rates that are significantly lower than traditional market price.

If you’re shopping for insurance through an agent, you can visit our InsureMass website or call the Division of Insurance at (617) 521-7794, and we can confirm for you that the agent you’ve been working with is licensed to operate in Massachusetts.

If you’re not working with an agent, do your research. Make sure that the benefits and services being offered provide the coverage you and family require. Compare prices with other companies. If the price being quoted is significantly out of line with other companies, ask why. Better yet, contact the Division and ask us.

In this time of counting every dollar, it is tempting to jump on what might look like a good deal for insurance. But it’s important to remember that taking a shortcut when it comes to your insurance could prove to be a path to more trouble for you and your family.

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