Post Content

data-breach

Orbitz, Expedia’s travel search engine subsidiary, recently announced a data security incident that occurred at the end of 2017. It is estimated that nearly 900,000 customers were impacted by the breach with 7,579 of those customers being Massachusetts residents.

According to Orbitz, personal information including full name, payment card information, date of birth, phone number, email address, billing address, and gender was made accessible to hackers through a cyber-attack. The investigation concluded that social security numbers and passport information were not subject to any unauthorized access.

As a result of the data breach, Orbitz is offering affected customers one year of complimentary credit monitoring and identity protection services. Customers who were affected may sign up for access to the free services by visiting the submission page or by calling the toll-free number at 1-855-828-3959.

If you think you may have been affected by this breach, be sure to take the following steps:

  • Review and monitor your credit and debit card accounts, making sure to look at older statements. If you notice any suspicious or unauthorized activity, contact your bank or the card issuer immediately.
  • Obtain a copy of your credit report. Consumers are entitled to one free credit report each year from each of the credit reporting bureaus (Experian, Equifax, and TransUnion).
  • Consider placing a credit freeze, credit lock, or fraud alert on your credit report. A credit freeze may incur fees but prevents any lenders from viewing your credit history without your permission. Placing a freeze ensures that no accounts or loans are created in your name. A credit lock is a more temporary alternative to a freeze. They often come with monthly fees rather than a fee to place/lift a credit lock and have similar protections to a freeze. Fraud alerts allow creditors to see your information, but require them to verify your identity before issuing credit.

If you have been a victim of identity theft, the credit reporting agencies cannot charge you to place, lift, or remove a security freeze, so long as you provide them with a valid police report.

If you were impacted the Orbitz data breach be sure to visit their website for new information as it is made available. If not, it is still smart to regularly check your accounts in case there is ever suspicious activity. Contact your local police department and file a report with the FTC if you think you are the victim of identity or financial theft. Acting fast instead of waiting will better protect you against identity fraud and the financial burdens that may come with it.

If you have additional questions, contact the Office of Consumer Affairs and Business Regulation by calling our Consumer Hotline at (617) 973-8787, or toll-free in MA at (888) 283-3757, Monday through Friday, from 9 am-4:30 pm. Follow the Office on Facebook and Twitter, @Mass_Consumer. The Baker-Polito Administration’s Office of Consumer Affairs and Business Regulation along with its five agencies work together to achieve two goals: to protect and empower consumers through advocacy and education, and to ensure a fair playing field for Massachusetts businesses. The Office also oversees the state’s Lemon Laws and Arbitration Program, Data Breach reporting, Home Improvement Contractor Programs and the MA Do Not Call Registry.

Written By:

Recent Posts

Avoiding the Impulse: Tips for Shopping Responsibly posted on Apr 18

Avoiding the Impulse: Tips for Shopping Responsibly

Today’s consumers have purchasing power at the touch of a button and a recent U.S. Bank Cash Behavior Survey shows that most Americans prefer using digital apps to paying with cash. While the new age of shopping may be convenient, it can also lead to   …Continue Reading Avoiding the Impulse: Tips for Shopping Responsibly

Recognizing rental scams posted on Apr 13

Recognizing rental scams

Deciding where to rent can be stressful and competitive rental markets often leave consumers with little time to give significant consideration to such an important decision. While it is easy to get overwhelmed by the number of affordable units one may come across during an   …Continue Reading Recognizing rental scams

Becoming a scam savvy senior posted on Apr 10

Becoming a scam savvy senior

In January, Undersecretary John Chapman was a part of a collaborative effort to educate the public about the warning signs of elder financial abuse. Secretary Alice Bonner from the Executive Office of Elder Affairs, Middlesex County District Attorney Marian Ryan, and Division of Banks Commissioner   …Continue Reading Becoming a scam savvy senior