Post Content

 

The other day, a friend of mine forwarded to me a classic e-mail phishing scam, the bank account that has been flagged for security reasons.

This one, however, isn’t really one of the better ones. Here it is:

Wells fargo e-mail

While this one comes with a proper looking logo and has a “@wellsfargo.com” e-mail address, there are a number of warning flags to take note. For example, it’s unlikely a major institution would misspell itself as “WellsFargo” – or even “wellsfargo” as it does in one instance. There are also a number of other grammatical errors – the random comma in the very first line, the random capitalizing of “Banking” and “Information” – that make clear this is not coming from a professional organization.

What these scam artists are trying to do is get you to cough up your account information and steal your identity and your bank account. In many cases, these e-mails look legitimate. They have what look like the appropriate logo and links, and can be much better written and deceptive.

Your bank is never going to ask you via e-mail for account information. If you get an e-mail like this, and you think it might be legitimate, call your bank at the phone number provided on your monthly statement, or go to their official website (not the one in the e-mail). They can tell you if there’s a problem with your account.

My friend was able to easily pick out this scam, but not all of these e-mails are so easily identifiable. Taking a second to ensure you’re getting legitimate e-mails can save you hours of headaches.

Written By:

Recent Posts

Spin Cycle Making Your Head Spin? posted on Mar 29

Spin Cycle Making Your Head Spin?

  Almost 3 million Samsung washing machines were recalled last November due to reports of excessive vibration and/or parts detaching from the washing machine. However, since the recall began, customers have been complaining about myriad of issues. Consumer news outlet, Consumerist, has been tracking the   …Continue Reading Spin Cycle Making Your Head Spin?

Immigration Scams posted on Mar 27

Immigration Scams

  The call to strengthen the United States’ borders has opened a new window of opportunity for con artists who are capitalizing on fear and uncertainty. The Boston Globe reported earlier this month that there has been an uptick in scammers posing as federal agents,   …Continue Reading Immigration Scams

Car Buyer Beware: ”Buy Here Pay Here” Used Car Financing and Sales are Riddled with Pitfalls posted on Mar 23

Car Buyer Beware: ”Buy Here Pay Here” Used Car Financing and Sales are Riddled with Pitfalls

  Many consumers need a loan to purchase a used vehicle. Consumers with poor or no credit will often seek financing from the dealer they are buying a car from. This financing is commonly referred to as “Buy Here Pay Here,” and it lets dealers   …Continue Reading Car Buyer Beware: ”Buy Here Pay Here” Used Car Financing and Sales are Riddled with Pitfalls