Post Content

 

The other day, a friend of mine forwarded to me a classic e-mail phishing scam, the bank account that has been flagged for security reasons.

This one, however, isn’t really one of the better ones. Here it is:

Wells fargo e-mail

While this one comes with a proper looking logo and has a “@wellsfargo.com” e-mail address, there are a number of warning flags to take note. For example, it’s unlikely a major institution would misspell itself as “WellsFargo” – or even “wellsfargo” as it does in one instance. There are also a number of other grammatical errors – the random comma in the very first line, the random capitalizing of “Banking” and “Information” – that make clear this is not coming from a professional organization.

What these scam artists are trying to do is get you to cough up your account information and steal your identity and your bank account. In many cases, these e-mails look legitimate. They have what look like the appropriate logo and links, and can be much better written and deceptive.

Your bank is never going to ask you via e-mail for account information. If you get an e-mail like this, and you think it might be legitimate, call your bank at the phone number provided on your monthly statement, or go to their official website (not the one in the e-mail). They can tell you if there’s a problem with your account.

My friend was able to easily pick out this scam, but not all of these e-mails are so easily identifiable. Taking a second to ensure you’re getting legitimate e-mails can save you hours of headaches.

Written By:

Recent Posts

What teens and seniors should know about 18-65 accounts posted on Apr 25

  April is Financial Literacy Month and the Office of Consumer Affairs and Business Regulation is offering tips on how to establish and maintain healthy financial habits. It’s never too early or too late to take an interest in your personal finances. But for many,   …Continue Reading What teens and seniors should know about 18-65 accounts

Tips to Reduce Your Junk Mail posted on Apr 20

  Many Americans open their mailboxes to find them stuffed with envelopes bearing the names of unfamiliar or unsolicited companies. 44 percent of junk mail is thrown away unopened. As a result, about 5.6 million tons of mail offers and advertisements end up in U.S.   …Continue Reading Tips to Reduce Your Junk Mail

Buyer Beware: Why clothing ads are not always what they seem posted on Apr 20

  Online shopping provides a fast, convenient platform for purchasing items without the hassle of driving to a store. However, scammers often take advantage of the popularity of the online retail industry, sending purchased products that are either not what was advertised or far inferior   …Continue Reading Buyer Beware: Why clothing ads are not always what they seem