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Every year, MassCEC puts together a report detailing the state of the clean energy industry here in Massachusetts, looking to see how many people and firms are working in this rapidly expanding field.

For MassCEC and me, this is like a report card – showing how well we’re doing in fulfilling our mission to create high-quality clean energy jobs for the long term.

. . .  And this year’s report card is one my parents can hang on the fridge.

photo of Governor Patrick and employees of Fraunhofer CSE demonstrating the panel testing process

Following his presentation, Governor Patrick toured Fraunhofer CSE’s solar research labs.

At an event Tuesday at the Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems, Gov. Patrick announced that the Commonwealth’s clean energy sector grew by 11.8 percent last year.

Over the past two years, clean energy jobs have grown by 24.4 percent with 5,557 clean energy companies now employing 79,994 workers across Massachusetts.

The number of clean energy workers grew in all four of the state’s geographic regions, across all technologies and types of positions.

We’re seeing the fruits of the progressive vision Gov. Patrick and the Legislature had in mind when they passed a series of sweeping legislative efforts aimed at putting Massachusetts on the forefront of the clean energy revolution.

As we celebrate this year’s success, we can’t let up – we must keep pushing this cause forward, supporting the clean energy businesses and employees of tomorrow as we look towards next year’s report card.

My parents better start clearing some room on that fridge.

 

Written By:


CEO and Executive Director at Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC)

As CEO Alicia Barton is responsible for the management of the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center including implementing policy as determined by the MassCEC’s Board of Directors.

Alicia Barton joined the MassCEC in August 2012 after serving as Deputy Commissioner for policy and planning at the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection. At MassDEP Alicia oversaw policy and regulatory matters for the agency, including clean air and water, climate change, wetlands and coastal issues, and all aspects of environmental permitting.

Alicia was the primary author of the MassDEP’s Action Plan for Regulatory Reform and she developed and launched the MassDEP Clean Energy Results Program, which leverages the agency’s technical and regulatory expertise to facilitate the siting and construction of clean energy projects in the Commonwealth.

From 2007 to 2011, Alicia held various other positions at the Massachusetts Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs including Assistant Secretary for Environmental Review, Massachusetts Environmental Policy Act (MEPA) Director and Deputy General Counsel. In her time at MEPA, Alicia oversaw implementation of the MEPA Greenhouse Gas Emissions Policy, which was a nation-leading policy designed to incorporate clean energy elements into real estate and infrastructure development projects.

After graduating from The Ohio State University with a degree in environmental science, Alicia earned a juris doctor from Boston College Law School. Alicia was an attorney in private practice prior to joining the Patrick Administration in 2007.

As part of her community involvement, Alicia has been a frequent guest lecturer at local law schools and universities, speaking on topics involving environmental law and policy and she previously served on the Board of Directors at St. Francis House, New England’s largest day shelter for the poor and homeless.

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