Post Content

Arthur Natella

Arthur Natella

Project Associate , Massachusetts Clean Energy Center

View Arthur's Complete Bio

In this final post of our three part series, we are highlighting the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center and Commonwealth Corporations’ new Clean Energy Workforce Training Capacity Building Curricula Library. In 2009, the MassCEC and Comm. Corp. partnered together and awarded six grants totaling $1 million to develop comprehensive workforce development programs for the clean energy industry. One of the results of this program was the creation of an online library of more than 30 lesson plans, certificates, and training programs for high school and college students, at-risk youth and low-income populations, building and trade professionals, and clean energy employers.

Both MassCEC and Comm. Corp understood the value of the curricula that resulted from the six Capacity Grants, so together they collected and compiled an online library consisting of all of the clean energy curricula formulated by the program. Now, the MassCEC and Comp. Corp have released this free training and education suite and launched it into the public domain for everyone to access.

Those who visit the online library will quickly see that this aggregate of clean energy courses available is diverse and comprehensive. If you are a start-up training facility, or an established trainer looking to refine existing programs, or anything in between, this repository will have something for you. Topics included in the lesson plans include solar photovoltaic and solar thermal installation, energy efficiency practices, best practices in developing train-the-trainer programs for construction trade programs for vocational schools, and programs for university level undergraduate and graduate students that address engineering, business, politics and economics.

As a partnership, the MassCEC and Comm. Corp. are very proud of the work that has resulted from the Capacity Grants. In addition to the high quality training that has allowed organizations to empower their trainees and the community around them, these grants have produced a free online resource to fine tune existing programs, which will increase the quality of the clean energy industry as a whole.

If you are interested in viewing or obtaining the suite of clean energy Clean Energy Workforce Training Capacity Building Curricula please visit www.masscec.com/curriculum

 

Written By:

Recent Posts

Solar a “No-Go” on Your Roof? Share Through Community Solar posted on Jul 16

Solar a “No-Go” on Your Roof? Share Through Community Solar

Harvard residents who wanted solar on their homes and were unable to get it due to shading, sloping, or structural barriers, found a solution by sharing the Harvard Solar Garden, an approximately 250 kW project, provides 41 residents and six small businesses with sustainable, clean energy. .

Summer’s Here: Shed Layers and Shed Loads posted on Jul 11

Summer’s Here: Shed Layers and Shed Loads

Electricity usage throughout New England reaches its peak during summer heat waves, causing our electricity bills to spike. During periods of high demand, electric utilities typically call on more expensive “peaking” plants to provide extra power. These costs are passed onto larger, non-residential consumers through demand charges on their monthly electricity bill. Municipal buildings can save a significant sum of money if they shut off portions of their electricity during these peak periods.

Massachusetts Rebates Supercharge Electric Vehicle Market posted on Jul 7

Massachusetts Rebates Supercharge Electric Vehicle Market

The MOR-EV initiative provides rebates of up to $2,500 for electric, fuel cell vehicles and plug-in vehicles with large batteries, and $1,500 for plug-in electric vehicles with smaller batteries. All Massachusetts residents are eligible to receive incentives on purchased and leased new electric vehicles until the rebate funds are gone.