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David Cash

David Cash

Assistant Secretary for Policy, Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs

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A week ago, I was giving a speech at a clean energy conference, showing the comprehensive approach that Governor Patrick has taken to launch the clean energy revolution and grow clean energy jobs, lower energy costs, become more energy independent and protect the environment. I showed the animated map of the expansion of solar photovoltaic systems in Massachusetts that’s posted here. As the map guided the audience through the last four years, and a light colored map (showing relatively few solar installations) dramatically darkened as town after town, city after city added new solar systems totaling over a thousand, there was an audible gasp…and then…raucous applause for concrete examples of the clean energy revolution!

In all the years leading up to 2007, about 3.5 MW of solar electric power had been installed in Massachusetts. By the end of this year, 60 MW will be installed.

I flashed up photos for the audience of solar projects: an electrician installing panels – that’s a job! Panels being manufactured in a Massachusetts plant – that’s a job! An architect designing new housing that will incorporate solar into the roof – that’s a job! An engineer ensuring that a big box flat roof store will be able to bear the weight of snow and solar panels – that’s a job! More than 55 MW of new solar installations – that’s a lot of jobs!

Then I flashed some more photos of other installations: On a school – that’s a school committee that will be less worried about energy costs and can focus more on teachers! On an affordable housing project – where residents will pay less for energy! On a small business – that small business owner will be paying $0 in electricity costs after the project pays for itself in four years and can invest more in the product – that’s good business!

Throughout the Commonwealth, the clean energy revolution has taken root. Watch it grow!

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As Deputy Director of DOER's Green Communities Division, Lisa helps lead a team devoted to working with Massachusetts cities and towns to realize environmental and cost benefits of municipal energy efficiency and renewable energy. Prior to joining DOER, Lisa worked in the Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs from 2007 to 2012, first as Press Secretary and then as Assistant Secretary for Communications and Public Affairs. Her previous communications and public relations experience includes both government and the private sector, where, as principal of upWrite Communications, she served clients such as The Trustees of Reservations, The Nature Conservancy, and Partners Health Care/North Shore Medical Center. She began her career as a journalist, covering Beacon Hill for the State House News Service, and later wrote for a variety of other publications including The Boston Globe, Teacher Magazine, Animals Magazine, and The Gulf of Maine Times. The author of two books, Lisa serves on the board of the Saugus River Watershed Council and resides with her family in Melrose.

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