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aerial image of sudbury's pv on capped landfill

1.5 MW solar array on Sudbury’s capped landfill

Massachusetts has just surpassed an exciting milestone of 15,000 solar photovoltaic (PV) installations, proving that solar energy has become a smart, popular choice here. In fact, as of August 21, there were 15,762 systems installed across Massachusetts, a twenty-fold increase from 2007 when Governor Deval Patrick took office, when there were only 788. The 615 megawatts installed at homes, businesses, schools, parking lots, landfills and elsewhere can provide enough power for 94,000 homes. This solar revolution is happening everywhere; there is at least one solar installation in 350 of 351 cities and towns. This success didn’t happen by chance. Earlier this summer, energy and environmental officials toured the Commonwealth, explaining the growth of the solar industry, as well as touting solar’s economic and environmental benefits. Have a look at the highlights from the day.

If you aren’t already thinking about solar energy for power or heat, I invite you to learn more about the opportunities here.

Written By:


Director, Marketing & Stakeholder Engagement

Susan Kaplan is a strategic communications and marketing professional with a passion for environment and clean energy issues, who has changed processes, cultures, and behaviors in government, business, and healthcare. As a corporate environmental stewardship pioneer at Polaroid Corporation in the 1990s, Susan modified business practices and marketed environmental attributes. Other professional responsibilities preceded and followed, but the chance to be part of the clean energy leadership team at DOER has been a welcome return to her roots. In her current position, she develops messages and strategies to engage Massachusetts’ businesses and homeowners in energy efficiency, renewable energy and energy markets. When work hours are over, Susan heads to the mountains and into the woods with her family.

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