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Alicia Barton McDevitt

Alicia Barton McDevitt

CEO and Executive Director at Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC)

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With a couple of weeks left before this program’s new October 31 deadline, I’m excited to tell you that our solar bulk purchasing program – Solarize Mass – is already a huge success.
Residents from 17 communities across Massachusetts have signed contracts for more than 288 roof-top solar systems that will produce 1.9 megawatts of clean, renewable energy and cut energy costs below traditional sources of electricity. This is enough to power the equivalent of 312 homes each year and cut the greenhouse gas emissions equal to those of 212 cars.

These numbers are incredible.

Farmers Market Photo 1_6 24 12 soLARIZEMy favorite part of the Solarize Mass program is the way it brings so many people together.
Our dedicated solar coaches, who are community volunteers, are working with municipal officials, residents, and businesses in their cities and towns to make sure people have the information and tools they need to participate in the program. Our program partners in the private sector – eight solar installers across the state – are working with communities and individuals to adopt this renewable source and drive down the cost of energy.

Administered by the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center and funded by the state Department of Energy Resources’ Green Communities Division, Solarize Mass builds on the enthusiasm and local know-how of these community representatives, residents, and businesses.

The hard work by all of these players has paid off; more than 4,000 residents have already expressed interest in the program, leading to more than 1,700 site visits completed. There are hundreds more scheduled for the coming days and weeks.

This interest is no small thing. Solar power will help the state decrease its dependence on outside energy sources and create local jobs in the process. Massachusetts spends $22 billion a year on energy, whether it’s to heat our homes or power our vehicles. Of that total, $18 billion is sent out of the state, out of the region, and out of the country.

Programs like Solarize Mass and others that promote the expansion of renewable energy are already keeping more of these dollars here in the Commonwealth, improving the state’s economy as a whole.

But we’re not done yet.

There’s still time for residents of the 17 Solarize communities – Acton, Arlington, Boston, Hopkinton, Melrose, Mendon, Millbury, Montague, Newburyport, Palmer, Pittsfield, Lenox, Shirley, Sutton, Wayland, Sudbury and Lincoln – to sign up to take part in this exciting program.

Interested? Head to the Solarize Mass website and get started!

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