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Tamika Jacques

Tamika Jacques

Director of Workforce Development at Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC)

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The 2013 Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) Internship Program will again provide opportunities this spring for college students and recent graduates to intern with interested clean energy companies based in Massachusetts.

Not only do interns earn a paycheck but they gain meaningful employment experiences including networking opportunities, mentoring, and hands-on training. For companies – including early-stage companies without the resources to employ a large staff – the students provide a steady and engaged workforce to help them get their projects off the ground.

I was lucky enough to join Governor Deval Patrick when he spoke last month at the 2012 Global Cleantech Meet-up and announced the expansion of the program to include 10-week internship sessions in the fall and spring, as well as traditional the 10-week summer program.

MassCEC internshipUniversity of Massachusetts Amherst chemical engineering graduate student QuynhAnh Tran and Boston University energy and environmental analysis major Amanda Colby were there too (pictured left to right with the governor). Both of them were hired as full-time employees after their internships.

They are two of the 38 students who gained full-time and part-time employment over the past two summers when the program placed more than 262 students and recent graduates at more than 77 clean energy companies across the state.

This program, co-sponsored by the New England Clean Energy Council, is a natural fit for us at MassCEC’s Workforce Development Program, which is dedicated to connecting Massachusetts’ talented workers with emerging and established Massachusetts clean energy companies, growing Massachusetts’ clean energy ecosystem.

Space in this program is limited, so we invite you to apply today.

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