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Rachel Offerdahl

Rachel Offerdahl

Multimedia intern, Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs (EEA)

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From avoiding chemical pesticides to recycling, it is easy to be "green" at home. This eighth post in the 96 Ways to Go Green! series suggests a few. For previous Go Green posts, scroll down!

71. Use eco-friendly soaps and cleaning products.

72. Use fans year-round to circulate cold air in the summer and warm air in the winter.

73. Wrap your water heater in an insulated blanket and don’t turn it up higher than 120.

74. Use traps instead of poisons to get rid of mice, rats, and insects.

75. Use cedar chips or aromatic herbs instead of mothballs.

76. Recycle printer cartridges. Some printer cartridges can be refilled and reused – ask your local office supply store.

77. Make pet treats from scratch and store them in a reusable container. It’s healthier for your pet, less expensive, and uses less packaging.

78. Burn seasoned woodinstead of green wood in your fireplace or woodstove, and don’t make a fire when air quality is poor.

79. When painting, staining, and finishing, avoid spray paint in favor of brushes or rollers. Buy low-VOC or water-based products and don’t buy more than you need for the project.

80. Have your septic system pumped and inspected regularly.

 

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As Deputy Director of DOER's Green Communities Division, Lisa helps lead a team devoted to working with Massachusetts cities and towns to realize environmental and cost benefits of municipal energy efficiency and renewable energy. Prior to joining DOER, Lisa worked in the Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs from 2007 to 2012, first as Press Secretary and then as Assistant Secretary for Communications and Public Affairs. Her previous communications and public relations experience includes both government and the private sector, where, as principal of upWrite Communications, she served clients such as The Trustees of Reservations, The Nature Conservancy, and Partners Health Care/North Shore Medical Center. She began her career as a journalist, covering Beacon Hill for the State House News Service, and later wrote for a variety of other publications including The Boston Globe, Teacher Magazine, Animals Magazine, and The Gulf of Maine Times. The author of two books, Lisa serves on the board of the Saugus River Watershed Council and resides with her family in Melrose.

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