Post Content

Doorhanger used in canvassing program

Doorhanger used in canvassing program

As one of the original 35 Green Communities in 2010, Greenfield has been a municipal clean energy and sustainability leader for years. Today, Greenfield continues to make great strides towards energy efficiency with its latest three-year canvassing project. Through its ongoing involvement of the entire community, Greenfield has been able to push home energy assessment programs, such as Mass Save®, to higher levels of participation.

Homes use nearly 25 percent of the energy consumed in the United States. Not only has Greenfield developed new measures to minimize residential energy consumption within its community, it has also created an educational handbook to help other cities and towns do the same. By significantly reducing the amount of energy consumed by homes, Greenfield has been able to lessen dependency on fuels such as heating oil, natural gas, and wood— thus, slowing impacts of climate change and saving money.

In order to increase communication between the city and its residents about energy efficiency in individual households, Greenfield decided to use federal funding from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to send program specialists from Energy Smart Homes (ESH) door-to-door to answer questions, explain the energy auditing process, and plan retrofit projects. So far, Greenfield has seen an increase in the number of residents willing to conduct energy assessments on their homes. In fact, home energy assessments in Greenfield have taken place at four times the statewide rate. Due to Greenfield’s success, the neighboring town of Wendell has decided to develop its own energy efficiency canvassing project, funded by part of Wendell’s Green Communities Grant.

Greenfield staff members have created a handbook called, Energy Efficiency Canvassing: How-To Get Started, to teach others how to develop similar canvas programs in their own muncipalities. This project provides an alternative method for communicating information regarding home energy efficiency. Rather than conventional advertising, which may only reach people who are already aware and committed to reducing energy consumption, Greenfield’s new door-to-door strategy allows the city to expand its target audience to those who still have questions about energy retrofit projects. This more personal approach is a way to grab residents’ attention and offer an educational experience for people who may be overwhelmed by larger issues surrounding energy reduction and climate change.

Handbook's program details for canvasser training

Handbook’s program details for canvasser training

The handbook first emphasizes the importance of setting goals: choosing a target audience, crafting a message, and delivering to residents. The book delves into strategies of how to access the right people and talk to renters and landlords. In addition, it gives advice about organizing, planning, and managing everyone involved in order to keep track of the important details like data and finances.

As a community whose mission is “to make Greenfield a more sustainable and vibrant place to live,” Greenfield has made it a priority for members of ESH to go to all 8,000 households in town to provide the appropriate information about cost effective energy efficiency. Canvassers have found that, by knocking on each door, more residents have been willing to engage in a conversation about energy efficiency than ever before. This dialogue has given ESH members an opportunity to clarify false information and walk residents through energy audit and retrofit processes.

There is a program that will fit everyone’s needs. You can find Greenfield’s handbook here: Energy Efficiency Canvassing: How-To Get Started

Written By:


DOER Intern

Abby Barnicle will be a senior in the fall of 2014 at Stonehill College, where she majors in English and Communication, and takes courses in Environmental Studies. After studying abroad in Rome last fall, Abby is ready to take on Boston for the summer. She is excited to learn more about energy efficiency in Massachusetts through her Summer 2014 internship with DOER.

Recent Posts

Fish Need Clean Energy, Too posted on Feb 18

Fish Need Clean Energy, Too

Running a fish farm is an intense operation, one that requires a lot of labor and a large amount of energy. Currently, the McLaughlin Hatchery uses a significant amount of oil to heat its facility. The facility is going to replace its oil furnace with a renewable energy heating system, a new high efficiency wood pellet boiler and pellet storage silo that will reduce greenhouse gas emissions by almost 92 percent, save an estimated $11,432 annually, and reduce annual oil use by more than 5,000 gallons.

Wood Pellets are the New Oil for Regional Schools Reducing Fuel Costs posted on Feb 12

Wood Pellets are the New Oil for Regional Schools Reducing Fuel Costs

Did you know that it is possible to heat buildings in the northeast using wood biomass, a renewable energy fuel? With nearly one-third of total energy costs going toward heating our buildings, it is no wonder that Massachusetts school districts are searching for cheaper and   …Continue Reading Wood Pellets are the New Oil for Regional Schools Reducing Fuel Costs

Natural Wildlife Setting Enhanced by New Zero Net Energy Building posted on Feb 6

Natural Wildlife Setting Enhanced by New Zero Net Energy Building

Constructing a commercial zero net energy building (ZNEB) is no easy task, especially one that is 45,000 square feet and sits in Massachusetts where the winters are cold and summers often hot and humid. This is why over 100 people gathered enthusiastically in December in   …Continue Reading Natural Wildlife Setting Enhanced by New Zero Net Energy Building