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image of a dovetail jointCan noise from a nearby wind farm make you sick? Can clean energy slow climate change? Energy and environmental concerns have always been difficult to separate. In 2007, Massachusetts became the first U.S. state to recognize the interdependence of energy and environment when the Patrick Administration combined oversight of energy and environment policy in one Cabinet-level secretariat.

The resulting Executive Office for Energy and Environmental Affairs (EEA) has since led by example, and its lead energy and environmental agencies partnered in 2011 to build on that success. The Department of Energy Resources (DOER) and Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP) began laying the groundwork to coordinate clean energy projects more closely through the Clean Energy Results Program (CERP).

aerial photo of 1.5 MW photovoltaic array on Sudbury's capped landfill

1.5 MW photovoltaic array on Sudbury’s capped landfill

CERP is designed to “streamline agency assistance to clean energy developers, municipal officials, and the public, and create a science-based set of resources to inform project review and siting statewide.” For example, consider the conversion of capped landfills for photovoltaic solar generation. The process provides clean, renewable energy, but its construction may release methane trapped inside the landfill. CERP removes any confusion between energy and environmental interests on both regulatory and operational fronts.

Coordination through CERP is making MassDEP more conscious of the state’s energy activities and focused DOER on sustainability aspects of energy development. Today, MassDEP leverages its permitting expertise to better assist community and business leaders explore and execute their clean energy options. And in the long-term, DOER hopes to green-light additional clean energy projects on DEP-regulated sites – provided that they are developed responsibly to minimize impact on the surrounding environment.

Key to this coordination is the CERP database, a collaborative effort between DOER and MassDEP to monitor ongoing clean energy programs in Massachusetts from proposal to completion. The database tracks all clean energy development on public land and any private development that involves MassDEP. Projects are tagged by site type, funding source, utilized technology, and other factors of energy or environmental interest.

The end result is a tool that allows state officials to identify and prioritize clean energy development across the Commonwealth. The database makes previously separate tracking data readily accessible in one place.

The CERP partnership illustrates a crucial interplay between the two agencies and their respective interests. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, Massachusetts’ energy needs have grown substantially over the years and policymakers may consider protected land for future development. And while renewable energy generation is typically cleaner than fossil fuel-fired sources, scientists warn that it is not without environmental impact. Coordinating DOER and MassDEP activities around these realities makes sense, and good sense makes good policy.

Still, governance does not begin and end with individual departments. CERP allows the responsible agencies to work within a consistent context on clean energy issues so that environmental requirements are addressed at project inception. This eliminates the potential need to mitigate impacts after project completion. CERP assures that DOER and MassDEP assets are used as efficiently as possible.

The Clean Energy Results Program represents the best of state government, harnessing complementary interests across agencies to better serve the public. It streamlines regulatory practices to expand the dialogue between energy policy and environmental protection, and improved on-the-ground implementation of those interests. CERP’s continued success sends an important message about innovative collaboration across governmental agencies.

Written By:


DOER Intern

Daniel Shea is a summer intern with DOER’s Marketing and Stakeholder Engagement team. A Political Science and Economics major at Northeastern University, Daniel has followed a passion for public policy across city and state government. At school, he served on the Executive Board of Northeastern’s intercollegiate debate team. Out of the office, he enjoys blogging, biking, hiking, and travel.

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