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image of EEMS analsys used by UMass-Lowell used to compare daily loads to last year’s usage data at the Tsongas Center to see that electricity usage was up at least 30%

EEMS analsys used by UMass-Lowell used to compare daily loads to last year’s usage data at the Tsongas Center to see that electricity usage was up at least 30%

The Enterprise Energy Management System (EEMS) – a real-time metering program installed across 25 million square feet of state owned buildings, managed by DOER’s Leading by Example Program’s (LBE) – was awarded the Regional Project of the Year by the Association of Energy Engineers (AEE) at the end of September. EEMS helps the state track energy use in real time, providing visibility and insight into data that was essentially nonexistent before EEMS implementation.

Massachusetts partnered with EnerNOC, an energy management company, to install nearly 1,300 meters at over 460 different buildings across the Commonwealth. These building-level meters provide real time usage data for electricity, natural gas, oil, steam, propane, and hot and chilled water.

Prior to meter installation, usage information was available only from monthly utility bills, and frequently data for individual buildings was not available at all. For example, UMass Lowell has over 46 buildings, yet it only had 15 utility electric meters. With the completion of EEMS across campus, facility managers can assess individual building performance, target efficiency efforts, and monitor and address anomalies as they occur. This saves money and reduces energy and greenhouse gas emissions.

DOER Commissioner Mark Sylvia commented on the EEMS effort and award: “The Patrick Administration’s ‘Leading by Example’ program has implemented innovative ways to reduce the Commonwealth’s energy consumption to save money and reduce environmental impacts. Real-time metering means that facility managers at state colleges, prisons, and office buildings can achieve energy savings and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.”

photo of AEE President, Bill Younger, DOER program coordinator, Maggie McCarey, EnerNOC’s Karthik Rao, Sean McKeon and Rob Kenerson, accepting the AEE Region 1 Project of the Year award

AEE President, Bill Younger; DOER program coordinator, Maggie McCarey; EnerNOC’s Karthik Rao, Sean McKeon and Rob Kenerson, accepting the AEE Region 1 Project of the Year award

The state has already begun to see the benefits of the system. For example:

  • Using EEMS data, UMass Lowell identified unusually high usage for their ice rink compared to the previous year’s usage, uncovering an issue with their building control settings that was quickly resolved. They saved $30,000 in just two months.
  • Through analysis of EEMS real-time data compared to building occupancy schedules, Bristol Community College was able delay their building start-up by an hour every morning, saving them an estimated $2,500 over the course of a year.
  • The new meters at Framingham State pointed building managers to a dorm that was not switching to a nighttime setting and was using the same amount of energy as it was during the day. With the settings corrected, the school estimates it will save $1,700 per year.

The LBE Program was established by Governor Patrick in 2007 and sets energy efficiency, greenhouse gas, and renewable energy goals for state government operations. See the website for more the program’s history and initiatives.

Written By:


Steve is interning in the fall of 2013 for DOER's Leading by Example program, working on the Enterprise Energy Management Systems (EEMS) and the renewable thermal program with the Department of Conservation & Recreation. He is a masters student in Environmental Science & Policy at Clark. A native of Syracuse, New York, Steve completed his undergraduate degree in Adolescent Education and Earth Science at SUNY Oneonta, majoring. Prior to attending Clark, he taught elementary science in the Syracuse Public Schools for three summers as a part of the "Say Yes to Education Program." In the fall of 2012, Steve worked with Worcester Energy as their Energy Analysis Intern, where he created the City of Worcester’s Energy Portfolio for city buildings, developed databases for the city’s Residential Rebate Pilot, and edited the city’s Climate Action Plan.

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