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Dan Burgess Dan Burgess

Clean Energy Fellow, Department of Energy Resources

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Are you looking for the latest energy news and updates in Massachusetts? You have come to the right place. The Energy Smarts blog provides an inside look into state energy policies, stories, and events that are happening across the Commonwealth. If you are also looking for up-to-the-minute updates, there are several state officials and agencies that are using Twitter to communicate about energy in Massachusetts. Here are my recommendations on which Twitter accounts you should follow for the latest in energy news.


DOER_GIF_72dpi_reasonably_small Department of Energy Resources – @MassDOER

From gas prices to solar installations and appliance rebates, the Department of Energy Resources Twitter feed is the place to go for all things energy in Massachusetts.


DCR_CommissionerSullivan_reasonably_smallEEA Secretary Richard K. Sullivan Jr. – @MassEEA

Energy and Environment Affairs Secretary Sullivan actively tweets from energy-related events and highlights related news stories. A recent tweet from the Secretary: Massachusetts leads clean energy revolution again, new facility tests #wind blades 90 meters long R http://yfrog.com/h7q11brj


CEC_Graphic_Logo_Only_reasonably_smallMassachusetts Clean Energy Center – @MassCEC

This quasi-public agency provides support for the clean energy sector and communicates the latest renewable news and updates. A recent tweet from this account: Check out this video on why MA is well positioned to take advantage of the burgeoning clean energy marketplace http://video.ft.com/v/983210935001/Massachusetts-reaps-a-wind-and-svestolar-har


Scottsoareshead_reasonably_smallAgriculture Commissioner Scott J. Soares – @AgCommishSoares

A frequent tweeter, Commissioner Soares often highlights energy policies that impact the agriculture community. My personal favorite from earlier this year: Flipping the switch on “Cow Power” in MA! Good for farms, our environment and our economy! http://www.telegram.com/article/20110519/FLASH/105199932


GreenSquanto2 Department of Energy Resources – @MassGreening

State staff assisting the Massachusetts private sector with energy programs (efficiency, renewables, clean energy).


Eneergy-smarts-twitter-iconEnergy Smarts blog – @maenergysmarts

This blog’s official Twitter handle, follow the feed to get information on the latest energy blog posts and other energy news from across the state.


MassgovernorGovernor Deval Patrick – @MassGovernor

An outspoken advocate of clean energy and an active new media user, Governor Patrick’s account is the most popular on this list and is a must follow for anyone who is interested in Massachusetts policies and events.


If you are interested in connecting with other officials and agencies online, you can find a comprehensive list of Official Commonwealth of Massachusetts Social Media Accounts online.

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