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Add it to the list– last week Massachusetts was ranked No. 2 in the nation for clean tech in Clean Edge Inc.’s 2013 Clean Tech Leadership Index, joining the numerous other accolades the state has been racking up in recognition of the enormous strides we have made in staking a claim towards global leadership in clean technology.

Getting there took the hard work and dedication of citizens, homeowners, businesses, academia, communities, environmentalists and regulators coming together to reach a common goal: leaving the next generation a cleaner energy future. Across the state, business owners put solar panels on their roofs, like this photo here of a homeowner in Hopkinton, who installed solar panels through the Solarize Mass program. Cities and towns committed to making municipal buildings more energy efficient. Investors put money into clean technology startups. Meanwhile, state, federal and local governments offered incentives and crafted policies to nurture this rapidly-growing industry.

It was this all-hands-on-deck approach that gave Massachusetts a perfect score in the public policy category, which scored states on transportation policies, building codes, climate change targets and renewable energy adoption rates. Massachusetts was also ranked No. 1 in capital category, which analyzed private venture capital investments and higher education and research.

But let’s not stop here, there’s more to be done. At MassCEC, we’re going to keep pushing forward with programs to assist residents, business and communities in continuing to grow the clean energy sector here in Massachusetts.

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