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electric vehicle charger on a streetIt’s an exciting time for those interested in reducing both the cost of driving cars and their impact on the environment. If you’ve thought about buying or leasing an electric vehicle, the Patrick Administration is offering help, with the launch of the Massachusetts Offers Rebates for Electric Vehicles (MOR-EV) program.

The MOR-EV initiative provides rebates of up to $2,500 for electric, fuel cell vehicles and plug-in vehicles with large batteries, and $1,500 for plug-in electric vehicles with smaller batteries. All Massachusetts residents are eligible to receive incentives on purchased and leased new electric vehicles until the rebate funds are gone.

mor-ev ride and drive eventDOER announced the MOR-EV program at its Clean Cities Coalition Workplace Charging Workshop, held at EMD Serono in June to educate organizations on electric vehicle charging. Centered on electric vehicles and their many benefits, the workshop provided the perfect opportunity to launch the program.

Alternative transportation, including electric vehicles, is key to reducing greenhouse gases (GHG) and meeting the Commonwealth’s energy and economic goals. In 2008, Governor Patrick signed the Global Warming Solutions Act (GWSA) and committed to reducing GHG emissions by 20 percent below 1990 levels for 2020 and 80 percent below 1990 levels by 2050. Subsequently, Massachusetts released the Clean Energy and Climate Plan (CECP), a portfolio of policies that state agencies are implementing to ensure GHG emissions are reduced to the targeted levels.Electric vehicle charging

With the transportation sector accounting for 37 percent of greenhouse gas emissions in Massachusetts, alternative transportation is a major focus of the CECP. In an effort to increase the number of zero emission vehicles (ZEV) on the road, Governor Patrick signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with seven other governors on the east and west coasts. At the end of May, they released a collaborative action plan to develop infrastructure, coordinated policies, codes and standards and a consumer market that will put 3.3 million ZEVs on the road by 2025. Massachusetts’ participation in this MOU includes the goal of reaching 300,000 ZEVs in the Commonwealth.

MOR-EV will help Massachusetts reach this goal of 300,000 ZEVs by 2025, as well as help the state meets its GHG emissions reductions goals for 2020. A continued increase in ZEVs will help to protect public health and air quality by reducing transportation-related air pollution that contributes to the formation of smog and related health effects such as asthma and heart disease.

sylvia mor-ev quote

To date, Massachusetts has seen tremendous growth in the number of electric vehicles being driven and the infrastructure to support them. In 2009, there were seven charging stations for electric vehicles. Currently, there are 226 charging stations that represent 569 charging points. The state has a total of 3,300 electric vehicles as of June, 2014. With the help of MOR-EV, Massachusetts can continue raising these numbers to address climate change, protect public health, save drivers money and promote economic growth throughout the Commonwealth.

For more rebate details and a list of eligible electric vehicles visit the website, www.MOR-EV.org. If you prefer to talk to a representative, call 866-900-4223 between the hours of 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. You can leave a message 24 hours a day.

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Katherine Kyrios will be a senior in the fall of 2014 at Colby College, where she is an English and Spanish double major and takes courses in Environmental Studies. Last Spring, she spent a semester abroad in Madrid. Excited to be back in Boston, she interned for the summer with DOER’s Marketing and Stakeholder Engagement group. She enjoys competitive tennis, writing, and traveling in Spanish-speaking countries and is looking forward to reporting on and learning more about the march of clean energy in Massachusetts.

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