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Alicia Barton McDevitt

Alicia Barton McDevitt

CEO and Executive Director at Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC)

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Earlier this month we received independent confirmation for something we’ve known around these parts for some time – Massachusetts’ clean technology firms are among the best in the world.

Seven firms headquartered right here in Massachusetts were named to the 2012 Global Cleantech 100 list put out the San Francisco-based think tank The Cleantech Group.

These companies – Joule in Bedford, Digital Lumens in Boston, FRX Polymers in Chelmsford, FirstFuel Software in Lexington, 1366 Technologies in North Lexington, Harvest Power in Waltham and Boston-Power in Westborough – have demonstrated that they are among the most successful private clean tech firms in the nation.

I’m very excited to see so many local firms represented on this prestigious list, which is compiled through judging from hundreds of individuals in the clean tech community who know exactly what makes a company successful.

Sitting at the end of the traditional energy pipeline, Massachusetts lacks indigenous supplies of coal, natural gas and oil. Of the $22 billion Massachusetts spends annually on energy, $18 billion of that goes to out-of-state and foreign sources.

There are firms across our state developing new technology every day to increase our energy independence, keep our energy dollars at home and create local jobs in the process.

The success of Massachusetts firms on this independent list also shows that the investments the state has made in the clean energy sector are paying off on a global scale. As Governor Deval Patrick has said before, Massachusetts is the heart of the clean energy revolution and if Massachusetts gets it right, the world will be our customer; and seeing local firms among the best in the world solidifies this belief.

The ranking is further proof Massachusetts clean tech firms are among the best in the world.

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