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Hannah BrunelleHannah Brunelle

Multimedia intern, Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs (EEA)

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When its hot outside, it's easy to let your energy bill get out of control. Keep your costs in check this summer with some simple things you can do around your home to monitor your energy use. As you start up your AC, remember to stay cool without sacrificing your energy bill by following some easy tips each week. This week remember to check your windows.

- Keep them closed; Close window shades, drapes and blinds during the day to keep the sun and glare out of your home, especially on south and west-facing windows. Also remember to close your windows when the AC is on.

- Find leaks; Find and seal air leaks in windows that cause drafts and make your cooling system work overtime. When remodeling choose ENERGY STAR® qualified windows to replace older models.

Not sure which temperature setting is most cost-effective for your home? Check back next week to find out.

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