Post Content

Energy is complicated, but it’s an issue that impacts each one of us.

According to ISO-New England, more than 8,000 megawatts of electricity generation capacity — or nearly 25 percent of the region’s generation fleet — is at risk of retiring by 2020. With that in mind, we cannot afford to wait. The Patrick administration is committed to an energy future that is reliable, secure and clean. To that end, we strongly support H3968 — “An Act Relative to Clean Energy Resources” — that was recently filed in the Legislature.

With so much electricity generation capacity on the verge of retiring, there are no big clean energy projects on the horizon to replace these retiring facilities.

To plan for this shortfall and ensure we remain on track to reduce our reliance on fossil fuels, the Patrick administration seeks enactment of H3968, which establishes a framework for bringing clean, reliable energy into our region. Massachusetts electric utility companies would be required to solicit bids for more than 2,400 megawatts of clean energy resources. While the utilities would determine the bids’ cost-effectiveness, the utilities are not required to enter into long-term contracts. Simply put — if the bids are not a good deal, there’s no mandate to sign on.

Critics contend this legislation boxes out solar and wind energy. Critics also call this legislation a rush to judgment. They say market-based mechanisms are the best means to address our energy needs, and that we are financially supporting Canadian corporations. We disagree.

The legislation does not mandate one energy source or another, nor does it pick winners and losers. Rather, it invites all offshore and onshore wind developers, as well as solar and hydro developers, to compete in the bid solicitation process. Given that the legislation invites all clean energy sources to submit cost-competitive bids, it is premature to say that our ratepayers will be supporting Canadian corporations. Currently, the commonwealth receives about half of its energy source from natural gas. That dependence leaves our citizens and business communities vulnerable to price volatility and price peaks. Bringing new sources of clean energy into Massachusetts would diversify our fuel mix and reduce our reliance on a single source of energy.

We are No. 1 in the nation in energy efficiency, and we have also seen 24 percent job growth in the clean energy industry in the last two years alone. We are proud of these accomplishments, but that’s not why Patrick has made a historic commitment to clean energy.

Patrick’s vision for our children has led this administration to aggressive but strategic investments to benefit future generations. Support of H3968 continues that commitment.

Rick Sullivan has been the secretary of energy and environmental affairs in Gov. Deval Patrick’s administration since early in 2011. He started his new job as Governor Patrick’s chief-of-staff on June 9.

This blog post is reprinted from Secretary Sullivan’s op-ed piece in the Boston Business Journal.

Written By:


Former Secretary of the Executiive Office Energy & Environmental Affairs

Until his move to become Gov. Patrick's chief of staff, Secretary Richard K. Sullivan Jr. oversaw the Commonwealth's six energy regulatory, environmental, and natural resource agencies: the Departments of Energy Resources, Environmental Protection, Public Utilities, Conservation & Recreation, Agricultural Resources and Fish & Game. He also served as Chairman of the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority, the Energy Facilities Siting Board, and the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center.

Secretary Sullivan has also overseen the Administration’s unprecedented commitment to land conservation – not only protecting more than 110,000 acres, but building more than 300 parks in urban communities. Under his tenure, EEA focused urban park investments on the 26 Gateway Cities, understanding these quality of life improvements drive economic health.

Sworn in at the start of Governor Patrick's second term, Secretary Sullivan built on the Patrick Administration's nation-leading first-term clean energy and environment accomplishments. Under Sullivan’s leadership, the Massachusetts clean energy sector has defied national employment trends. In the last year alone, the industry has seen 11.8 percent job growth. He is also credited with overseeing Massachusetts’ energy efficiency initiatives, which have three times earned the Commonwealth the number one ranking in the nation in energy efficiency from ACEEE.

Recent Posts

Home Baked Energy Efficiency with a Tasty Glazing posted on Sep 30

Home Baked Energy Efficiency with a Tasty Glazing

To reduce home energy consumption as rates rise, one town in Northwest Massachusetts has found a creative do-it-yourself solution.

Renewables To Blunt Power Outages From Major Storms posted on Sep 26

Renewables To Blunt Power Outages From Major Storms

To make sure that Massachusetts can avoid the energy-related problems faced by New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania during Hurricane Sandy, the Community Clean Energy Resiliency Initiative will provide municipalities with reliable, renewable alternatives to diesel generators that also align with the Commonwealth’s greenhouse gas reduction and clean energy goals.

Energizing Future Generations posted on Sep 23

Energizing Future Generations

For the past two years, Massachusetts has participated in a federal program that recognizes schools working hard to educate future generations about clean energy and improvements in Massachusetts school buildings. This year, the Commonwealth will again participate in the U.S. Department of Education’s Green Ribbon Schools recognition program.