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Hannah BrunelleHannah Brunelle

Multimedia intern, Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs (EEA)

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As promised, this week's energy tip will help keep your home within a comfortable range while temperatures soar this week. Having trouble keeping your energy bill low? It may be due to unecessary AC use.

Adjusting-thermostat1-001
Photo credit: greenbuildingelements.com

 Control temperature: Keep central and room air conditioner units at highest temperature that’s comfortable. A suggested temperature range for summer is between 74ºF – 78ºF. When you're away from home, setting the temperature higher will provide optimum cooling savings. This will keep your body temperature in range with the outdoor temperatures to ensure your body isn’t shocked when you enter drastically different temperature ranges. 

 

 

Check back next week for more tips on how to manage your energy costs and be sure to visit mass save for more useful tips. 

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