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Dan Burgess Dan Burgess

Clean Energy Fellow, Department of Energy Resources

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On one of the first sunny days earlier this spring, Secretary of Energy and Environmental Affairs (EEA) Rick Sullivan and Department of Conservation and Recreation Commissioner (DCR) Ed Lambert joined other state officials to cut the ribbon on a 48 kW solar photovoltaic (PV) installation on Chickatawbut Hill in Milton. Located adjacent to the Blue Hills Reservation, Chickatawbut Hill is just minutes from Boston and is another shining example of the positive impact that investments in clean, sustainable energy are having in Massachusetts.

The solar array will produce over 62,000 kWh a year in clean energy; enough electricity to power both the nearby Blue Hills Trailside Museum and the Norman Smith Environmental Education Center. Each year, the project will generate more than $18,000 in solar credit revenue and will reduce DCR’s electric utility bill by $8,000. In addition, the Education Center will use the solar panels as a teaching tool to educate the community about renewable energy and its benefits. The installation, which was overseen by the Division of Capital Asset Management, was funded through a Clean Renewable Energy Bond and a grant from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act allocated by the Department of Energy Resources.

For more photos from the ribbon cutting ceremony, please check out the photo gallery below.

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