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Dan Burgess Dan Burgess

Clean Energy Fellow, Department of Energy Resources

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December_Wind

This week on the blog, we are launching a new effort to highlight some of the amazing clean energy and energy efficiency efforts happening across Massachusetts. To do this, we’re going to use numbers. These numbers will help to provide clarity around the progress we are making in the Commonwealth and will represent the most recent and accurate information we have at the time of the post.

The first Energy Number is 44; the number of megawatts of wind power installed in Massachusetts as of December 1, 2011. This is more than a 10-fold increase in wind power since 2007 and represents a significant investment in a clean energy future for the Commonwealth. This photo is of the Air Force’s new 1.5 megawatt wind turbine at the Massachusetts Military Reserve in Cape Cod and was taken at the recent ribbon cutting. This turbine will generate clean, homegrown electricity and is estimated to save the Air Force Center for Engineering and the Environment over $1.5 million per year .

Visit our wind page or the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center  to learn more about wind energy in Massachusetts and check out the Renewable Energy Snapshot to see the progress the Commonwealth has made since 2002.

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