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Carter Wall

Carter Wall

Executive Director, Renewable Energy Division, Massachusetts Clean Energy Center

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After less than a month in operation, the Falmouth Wind turbine is cranking out the green kilowatt hours like nobody’s business. See how much it’s producing.

Falmouth Wind Turbine

This turbine was truly a community effort. The town voted overwhelmingly to support the project, and even school kids got involved. The Falmouth Energy Committee sponsored a “Name the Wind Turbine” contest. Thirteen-year-old Kiernan Galbraith, pictured here, was the winner, dubbing the turbine “Aeolus,” after the Greek ruler of the winds. See pictures of the turbine.

Funding for the turbine came from a variety of sources. My shop, the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center, was a proud contributor – part of our effort to help communities participate in meeting Governor Patrick’s goal of 2000 megawatts (MW) of wind power in the Commonwealth by 2020. There are currently 19 of these community-scale turbines (turbines 100 kW or greater) operating in the state, with over 15 MW of capacity.

This 1.65 MW Vestas wind turbine, located at the town’s wastewater treatment plant, is expected to produce about 30 percent of the electricity consumed annually by the town’s municipal buildings, saving the town over $200,000 a year on energy costs and making Falmouth one of the leading “clean energy” towns in the Commonwealth. The town recently voted to support another turbine nearby. EEA Secretary Bowles recently visited the Falmouth turbine to congratulate town officials and the Cape at large for their clean energy leadership.

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