Post Content

Anna Waclawiczek

Anna Waclawiczek

Chief of Staff, Department of Agricultural Resources (DAR)

View Anna's Bio

Egg Carton with Date

Looking for ways to make an eco-friendlier and healthier Easter? Click here to find farms selling fresh, local Massachusetts eggs, and, for an even greener Easter, click here to check out these natural dye recipes!

Egg Carton with Date

DAR’s Megan Megrath says eggs are graded by measuring the interior quality of the egg by passing it before a candling light. The depth of the air cell (as seen on the top of the egg in the picture) along with the mobility of the yolk when the egg is spun before the light determines the interior grade. Larger air cells and greater mobility of the yolk indicate a lower quality grade. Grade A eggs should have an air cell no bigger than 3/16” in depth with little or no yolk movement. An egg cartoon with the USDA A shield signifies that those eggs were graded in a processing plant under the supervision of a USDA Poultry Products grader.

Eggs are sized in categories: jumbo, extra large, large, medium, and small. One large egg weighs 2 ounces. Eggs not weighed or candled are sold as ungraded and unsized or “nest run.” Click here for more information about how eggs are graded.

Eggs are high in protein and a great snack food to take along for all of your Great Outdoors adventures. Click here to check out some great egg recipes at the American Egg Boards website.

Written By:

Recent Posts

A Whale of a License Plate posted on Jul 28

A Whale of a License Plate

Wish your license plate was more identifiable? Want to save whales? Well, there is a way to achieve both of these at once. Perhaps the old saying about hitting two birds with one stone should be “do two cool things with one easy payment to the   …Continue Reading A Whale of a License Plate

Before the Boston Seafood Festival, Reconsider the Lobster posted on Jul 23

Before the Boston Seafood Festival, Reconsider the Lobster

Everything that you have been told about lobsters is a lie. Okay, maybe not everything. But despite the popularity of the lobster industry (and it’s a very popular industry—bringing in over $53 million dollars in Massachusetts alone), many popular beliefs about the lobster’s existence are   …Continue Reading Before the Boston Seafood Festival, Reconsider the Lobster

Braille Trail Coming Soon to Watertown posted on Jul 21

Braille Trail Coming Soon to Watertown

The town of Watertown, in partnership with the Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR) will be opening a Braille Trail and a Sensory Garden, one of the few parks of its kind. Breaking ground on July 21st, this project hopes to be completed by late   …Continue Reading Braille Trail Coming Soon to Watertown