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Tim Purinton

Tim Purinton

Acting Director, Department of Fish and Game’s Division of Ecological Restoration

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Keeping with the theme that June is Massachusetts Rivers Month, I wanted to highlight a couple of paddling guides that would inspire you to kayak a river or canoe a creek.

One of the best paddling guides is the Sudbury River Boater’s Trail in Wayland and Concord. Check out this internet map-based guide that highlights natural and cultural wonders that makes the Sudbury River a nationally recognized Wild and Scenic River. The map points out Thoreau’s landmarks, gives you wildlife tips such as marsh wren hangouts, and is broken into three, five-mile trips best done in half-day increments.

If salt water is more your thing, there is a water trail guide to the North Shore’s Great Marsh (see photos below) worth investigating. The Great Marsh is New England’s largest salt marsh at over 20,000 acres and is chock-full of meandering creeks, oak islands and ephemeral tidal flats.

The guide highlights access points, points of interest and has most of what you need to know (except local clam shacks) from Salisbury to Rockport.

Getting to know and love a river is the first step in restoring it. A partial list of the groups protecting our rivers and watersheds.

See you on the water.

Canoeing, river marsh

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