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The horse, llamas and goats of Carraig Farm in Ashby. Photograph by  Tamara Buckley-Leclerc,

The horse, llamas and goats of Carraig Farm in Ashby. Photograph by Tamara Buckley-Leclerc,

February’s contest winner was Tamara Buckley-Leclerc, who photographed her llamas, goats and horse from Carraig Farm in Ashby.

Tamara Buckley-Leclerc is a champion of land stewardship and sustainable agriculture. For approximately 15 years, along with her husband Scott and their three children, she has managed 130 acres of land. Originally cow pasture in the early 1900′s, the property still features pasture wells and miles of hand-built stone walls. Through the Department of Conservation and Recreation’s Forest Stewardship Program, the Leclercs’ developed a 10-year plan that protects the ecosystem value of their forest and woodlands.

Carraig Farm is home to pasture-raised sheep, goats, llamas, free-range chickens, ducks, a pony and a cat named Fabio Bob. Tamara is a “Jill of All Trades” and, when not doing barn chores, pasture cleanup or chasing around three children, the farmer and craft-enthusiast can be found in her studio being creative. Tamara offers educational workshops on the farm, including wool spinning and dying. The biggest project at Carraig Farm for 2014 is building a new year-round farm store partially made from recycled beer and wine bottles.

The Leclerc family’s commitment to land conservation and sustainable agriculture started with an interest in growing and producing food for themselves and their family and has grown to a direct market farm business. During the summer, their CSA subscriptions include chemical-free vegetables, fruit, flowers, poultry, eggs, as well as farm-produced items such as dried herbs, jams and their own goat milk soap and lavender sachets. In the off season, poultry, goat, lamb, and eggs (duck and chicken), in addition to jams and chutneys, are also for sale at their farm store or by calling 978-386-2379.

Each month, we are posting the 2014 Massachusetts Agriculture Calendar’s photo of the month. Featuring photos of Bay State farming, the calendar is available for purchase. All photos were taken by amateur photographers who won the annual Massachusetts Agriculture Calendar Photo ContestProceeds from the $10 calendars benefit Massachusetts Agriculture in the Classroom, a non-profit organization that works with teachers to develop classroom materials. The calendar features a winning photograph each month, as well as interesting facts about local agriculture.

 

Written By:


DAR Program Coordinator

With a background in the culinary arts, nutrition education and program development, Julia joined The Department of Agricultural Resources Division of Agricultural Markets in 2008 to help spread the word about Massachusetts’ incredible agricultural and culinary opportunities. She also coordinates several grant and marketing programs available to a diversified group of growers and agricultural associations across the Commonwealth. A Boston University graduate, she can be found in her spare time sourcing out the best local products for her next culinary creation or volunteering in the community.

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