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Two dairy cows; a Guernsey and a Jersey at Stanley Farm in Boxborough. Photo by Liz West.

Two dairy cows; a Guernsey and a Jersey at Stanley Farm in Boxborough. Photo by Liz West.

June’s Massachusetts Agriculture Calendar Photo Contest winner was Liz West, who photographed two adorable dairy cows; a Guernsey and a Jersey at Stanley Farm in Boxborough.

June is National Dairy Month, a time to celebrate and enjoy dairy products when milk production typically is at its peak. In June, and indeed all year long, we want to raise our milk glasses and toast Massachusetts dairy farmers, their cows and the hard work they do every day to produce local, wholesome milk. Dairy farming has been a part of Massachusetts agriculture ever since the early settlers brought cows to Plymouth in 1624.

Dairy farming is essential to the vitality and diversity of Massachusetts agriculture and is part of our cultural tradition. Dairy farming maintains 113,600 acres of open space and land preservation which enhances a beautiful working landscape available for recreation, wildlife habitats and scenery; and dairy farming circulates approximately $40 million to a local economy. Dairy farmers and their cows work hard every day to produce roughly 246 million pounds of fresh, nutritious, wholesome milk which is used to make delicious products like cheese, yogurt, ice-cream, and butter. Many Massachusetts dairy farms utilize innovative “green” farming practices and support energy efficiencies on their farms. Visit a dairy farm today!

Each month, we are posting the 2014 Massachusetts Agriculture Calendar’s photo of the month. Featuring photos of Bay State farming, the calendar is available for purchase. All photos were taken by amateur photographers who won the annual Massachusetts Agriculture Calendar Photo Contest. Proceeds from the $10 calendars benefit Massachusetts Agriculture in the Classroom, a non-profit organization that works with teachers to develop classroom materials. The calendar features a winning photograph each month, as well as interesting facts about local agriculture.

Written By:


DAR Program Coordinator

With a background in the culinary arts, nutrition education and program development, Julia joined The Department of Agricultural Resources Division of Agricultural Markets in 2008 to help spread the word about Massachusetts’ incredible agricultural and culinary opportunities. She also coordinates several grant and marketing programs available to a diversified group of growers and agricultural associations across the Commonwealth. A Boston University graduate, she can be found in her spare time sourcing out the best local products for her next culinary creation or volunteering in the community.

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