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Celebrate harvest with agricultural fairs this September

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Maia Fitzstevens

Maia Fitzstevens

Multimedia intern, Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs (EEA)

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This September, agricultural fairs across the Commonwealth will showcase the bounty of our local harvest and offer fun and entertainment for everyone, in addition to being a cultural and historical highlight of our state. Attending one of these fairs is something you won’t want to miss! I’ve highlighted a few of the fairs below.

The Topsfield Fair is the oldest continuously running agricultural fair in America, and will run this year from September 28-October 8, 2012. Come to this fair to experience the joy of fireworks, a grand parade, a pumpkin contest, animal shows, and sand sculptures. Come to enjoy a caramel apple, a live band, a ferris wheel ride, or simple petting a baby goat or miniature horse.

Photo credit: mike01905 on flickr.com

The Franklin County Fair will occur from September 6-9, this year. The theme will be “Memories, Music and Magic”! It’s organized by the Franklin County Agricultural Society, whose goal is to educate and engage the community. It’s everything you want in a country fair, with everything from carnival rides to cattle shows. One essay even calls the Franklin County fair as “American as apple pie”!

The Belchertown Fair occurs from September 21-23, and this year’s theme is “Poultry in Motion”. Horse and oxen pulls are a main attraction, and the opening parade features community bands, fire trucks, floats and marching groups. The Belchertown Fair is home to one of the best exhibit halls in the state, and features livestock and agricultural displays and demonstrations for all to enjoy. This is the perfect small town agricultural fair to help connect you to our state’s agricultural cultural heritage.

Photo credit: Heyes on flickr.com

Contact Ellen Hart at 617-626-1742 or email Ellen.hart@state.ma.us for a copy of the Agricultural fairs brochure. Be sure to check out the MassGrown interactive google map for a complete listing of agricultural fairs in the Commonwealth. There’s sure to be one near you!

 

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Celebrate Harvest with Agricultural Fairs this September

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This September, agricultural fairs across the Commonwealth will showcase the bounty of our local harvest and offer fun and entertainment for everyone, in addition to being a cultural and historical highlight of our state. Attending one of these fairs is something you won’t want to miss! I’ve highlighted a few of the fairs below.

The Topsfield Fair is the oldest continuously running agricultural fair in America, and will run this year from September 28-October 8, 2012. Come to this fair to experience the joy of fireworks, a grand parade, a pumpkin contest, animal shows, and sand sculptures. Come to enjoy a caramel apple, a live band, a ferris wheel ride, or simple petting a baby goat or horse. The Franklin County Fair will occur from September 6-9, this year. The theme will be “Memories, Music and Magic”! It’s organized by the Franklin County Agricultural Society, whose goal is to educate and engage the community. It’s everything you want in a country fair, with everything from carnival rides to cattle shows. One essay even calls the Franklin County fair as “American as apple pie”!

The Belchertown Fair occurs from September 21-23, and this year’s theme is “Poultry in Motion”. Horse and oxen pulls are a main attraction, and the opening parade features community bands, fire trucks, floats and marching groups. The Belchertown Fair is home to one of the best exhibit halls in the state, and features livestock and agricultural displays and demonstrations for all to enjoy. This is the perfect small town agricultural fair to help connect you to our state’s agricultural cultural heritage.

Contact Ellen Hart at 617-626-1742 or email Ellen.hart@state.ma.us for a copy of the Agricultural fairs brochure. Be sure to check out the MassGrown interactive google map for a complete listing of agricultural fairs in the Commonwealth. There’s sure to be one near you!

 

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