Post Content

Tim Purinton

Tim Purinton

Director, Department of Fish and Game’s Division of Ecological Restoration

View Tim's Bio

Time-lapse nature photography has been used to track the Aurora Borealis, the retreat of glaciers, the migration of sea turtles and the growth of giant pumpkins. The Huffington Post compiles the cream of the crop; the best time lapse nature videos of 2012 is due out soon, the 2011 videos can been seen here.

Restoration ecologists use time-lapse photography to document projects including dam removal to restore rivers. The Condit Dam breach in Washington State is a dramatic example (let’s just say it involves explosives). 

Here in Massachusetts we have yet to use dynamite to aid in our dam removal efforts but they are exciting all the same. Instead you will see in Pelham, Taunton and Cheshire images of restoration in action – from dams being removed by excavators, to new wildlife friendly culverts installed in seconds before your eyes. In 3 minutes or less see what it takes us and our partners years to plan, permit and implement.

 

Written By:

Recent Posts

The View from Massachusetts posted on Sep 17

The View from Massachusetts

While Massachusetts can claim significant success in urban river revitalization, dam removal, cranberry bog naturalization and stream flow restoration, globally there are daunting challenges to restore highly impacted or vanishing ecosystems that will test the acumen of ecologists, engineers and politicians for years to come.

2014 DAR Agricultural Calendar: September posted on Sep 12

2014 DAR Agricultural Calendar: September

September’s photo contest winner was Gary Kamen, who photographed Mount Warner Vineyard in Hadley. Mount Warner Vineyards is a farm-winery located in Hadley, a small town in the beautiful Pioneer Valley. Operated by Gary and Bobbie Kamen, their philosophy is to recognize the unique characteristics of   …Continue Reading 2014 DAR Agricultural Calendar: September

Calling All Shuckers! posted on Sep 3

Calling All Shuckers!

Do you know where the oysters you ate at the raw bar last night were grown? Do you know how oysters are grown? Oysters naturally inhabited the eastern coast dating back to the 1700s, but due to over-harvesting, disease, and habitat loss, wild oysters have   …Continue Reading Calling All Shuckers!