Post Content

Tim Purinton

Tim Purinton

Director, Department of Fish and Game’s Division of Ecological Restoration

View Tim's Bio

Time-lapse nature photography has been used to track the Aurora Borealis, the retreat of glaciers, the migration of sea turtles and the growth of giant pumpkins. The Huffington Post compiles the cream of the crop; the best time lapse nature videos of 2012 is due out soon, the 2011 videos can been seen here.

Restoration ecologists use time-lapse photography to document projects including dam removal to restore rivers. The Condit Dam breach in Washington State is a dramatic example (let’s just say it involves explosives). 

Here in Massachusetts we have yet to use dynamite to aid in our dam removal efforts but they are exciting all the same. Instead you will see in Pelham, Taunton and Cheshire images of restoration in action – from dams being removed by excavators, to new wildlife friendly culverts installed in seconds before your eyes. In 3 minutes or less see what it takes us and our partners years to plan, permit and implement.

 

Written By:

Recent Posts

Calling All Insect-Loving Volunteers! posted on Jul 30

Calling All Insect-Loving Volunteers!

I always thought wasps were the bad guys growing up. But smokey-winged beetle bandit wasps (Cerceris fumipennis) are actually the good guys – used to kill off an invasive species. This specific type of wasp (that does not sting) catches Emerald Ash Borer (EAB), a   …Continue Reading Calling All Insect-Loving Volunteers!

A Whale of a License Plate posted on Jul 28

A Whale of a License Plate

Wish your license plate was more identifiable? Want to save whales? Well, there is a way to achieve both of these at once. Perhaps the old saying about hitting two birds with one stone should be “do two cool things with one easy payment to the   …Continue Reading A Whale of a License Plate

Before the Boston Seafood Festival, Reconsider the Lobster posted on Jul 23

Before the Boston Seafood Festival, Reconsider the Lobster

Everything that you have been told about lobsters is a lie. Okay, maybe not everything. But despite the popularity of the lobster industry (and it’s a very popular industry—bringing in over $53 million dollars in Massachusetts alone), many popular beliefs about the lobster’s existence are   …Continue Reading Before the Boston Seafood Festival, Reconsider the Lobster