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Marion Larson

Marion Larson

Outreach Coordinator, MassWildlife

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Hen Turkeys

Report your turkey family sightings to biologists this summer! From June 1 through August 31, birders, hunters, and other outdoor enthusiasts are invited to participate in the annual wild turkey brood (family) survey.

The survey data aids biologists in estimating poult (young turkey) production and survival for the year. Reports from citizens are useful in obtaining a large sample for this survey. Biologists need information on sightings of hen turkeys (no male turkey flocks) with or without their young. Please record the date, town, number of hens seen, and number of poults (young turkeys) and their relative size compared to the hens. See the image taken by MassWildlife's Bill Byrne, showing poults of differing sizes. In some cases, you might see turkey broods with poults of varying sizes indicating that some hens nested late, or they failed in their first attempt and re-nested. Repeat reports of the same flock are also welcome as there may be some young missing later in the season from illness or predators.

Keep the Wild Turkey Brood Survey form around the house from June through August, filling it in as you see turkey broods.

After August 31 mail the form to: MassWildlife Field Headquarters, 1 Rabbit Hill Rd, Westborough, MA 01581.

Interesting facts about wild turkeys.

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