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Anna Waclawiczek

Anna Waclawiczek

Chief of Staff, Department of Agricultural Resources (DAR)

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Pancakes with maple syrup

A whiff of warm syrup drizzling over hot buttery pancakes is pretty much a sure thing to ruin most anyone’s resolve on dietary New Year’s Resolutions. If you’re going to give in, what better way than to savor locally made syrup from your own maple sugar tree? All you need is a sugar maple or two in your backyard.

The Drumlin Farm Nature Center will be hosting a course on Saturday, February 6, 2010 from 1 to 4 p.m. that will teach you tree identification, equipment requirements, tapping techniques, weather considerations, cooking methods, and proper storing. Click here for more information on the Drumlin Farm course.

Maple syrup bucket

This course costs $25 for members and $35 for non-members and is open to adults and teens 16 years or older, and children age 12 or older with an adult. Registration is required, as is warm clothing (it’s February after all!). For more information, contact Drumlin Farm at drumlinfarm@massaudubon.org.

For Massachusetts farmers, the first tapping of maple sugar trees (usually the beginning of March) heralds in the first agricultural harvest of the New Year. Massachusetts is home to plenty of maple sugar tree growers. Did you know that Massachusetts maple producers tap 50,000 gallons of maple syrup annually, valued at $3 million dollars?

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