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EEA-KateSampKate Samp

Multimedia intern, Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs (EEA)

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Did you love that field trip your class took to a state park? Did you think it was cool when your teacher taught you how vernal pools are perfect habitats for salamanders and frogs? Let them know! Don’t let your classmates or teachers go unnoticed in their efforts to promote environmental education. Last year students and teachers were honored for an osprey nest project, recycling programs and ocean studies.

This spring, Secretary Richard K. Sullivan. Jr. will honor Massachusetts teachers and students who are involved in school-based programs that promote environment and energy education.

The nomination deadline is fast approaching. Applications to nominate your classmate or teacher are due this Monday, March 28.

Applications will be reviewed through mid-April. Teachers and students who qualify will be invited to attend a formal award ceremony at the State House in Boston later in the spring.

Please apply online here or contact Meg Colclough at 617-626-1110 or meg.colclough@state.ma.us.

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