Post Content

Marion Larson

Marion Larson

Outreach Coordinator, MassWildlife

View Marion's Bio

You just found out your local town clerk or other favorite license vendor is no longer selling hunting, fishing, or trapping licenses. That’s because the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife (MassWildlife) has eliminated handwritten licenses, permits, and stamps. Many town clerks and vendors chose not to participate in the new MassFishHunt system. No more depending on the mail for Division permits!

MassFishHunt license
MassFishHunt License search – click for larger image

It’s easy to buy a license, stamps, turkey or bear permits, take the Harvest Information Program (HIP) survey and apply for an antlerless deer permit. Here’s how:

  • Go to www.mass.gov/dfwele/licensing/index.htm which explains the new MassFishHunt electronic license system. Follow the instructions, and print out your license, permits, and tags! You need a credit card and will pay a $1.50 MassFishHunt convenience fee per license plus a 3 percent credit card fee for the total transaction. 
  • Visit your local MassWildlife office. MassWildlife District Offices are located in Ayer, Belchertown, Bourne, Dalton, and West Boylston; or visit the Westborough Field Headquarters or Boston office. Only checks, cash and money orders are accepted.
    DFW's Jill Durand selling license
  • Go to an official license vendor in your area to buy licenses, turkey and bear permits, and stamps. You can also apply for an antlerless deer permit and complete a HIP survey. Contact your local MassWildlife office for a list other license vendors. You can pay in cash, checks, or credit card at these locations.
  • What if you don’t own a computer or printer, or you’re computer-phobic? Visit your local library where staff can help you in the process. A number of people use libraries to download tax forms and conduct e-commerce. You will need a credit card and be prepared to pay a small fee to the library for printing out your paperwork.
  • Remember, minors ages 15-17 may not buy a hunting or sporting license through home or library computers, but must go through a license vendor or MassWildlife office. They (or their parents) need to provide a hunter education card and/or letters of consent.
  • NEW for 2012: Antlerless Deer Permit Procedure. Antlerless deer applications are still due by July 16 and can only be applied for through MassFishHunt. Here’s what’s new:  between July 31 and December 31, applicants must go back online to MassFishHunt (at home or any license vendor) and go through a menu which will immediately notify the applicant if they were selected for a permit in the zone of their choice.
  • NEW for 2012! Freshwater fishing Licenses for minors ages 15-17 are now free.  They still need a license to fish, but it’s free. Youths under age 15 can fish, but don’t need a license.

Need more information? Call the nearest MassWildlife office about the new system or go online. Click the link to the FAQ section and a detailed explanation on the new system. 

My final suggestion to the computer-savvy license buyer: Be a good sport by offering to help your computer–phobic friend or family member to purchase their license on line. That way you can ensure that you all will be ready to enjoy the great outdoors together throughout the year!

Written By:

Recent Posts

Park Profiles: Groundwork Lawrence posted on Jul 15

Park Profiles: Groundwork Lawrence

In late April, Governor Deval Patrick and former Secretary of Energy and Environmental Affairs Rick Sullivan joined Mayor Dan Rivera and Senator Barry Finegold to make an exciting announcement.  Governor Patrick announced a $2.75 million investment in Lawrence’s Ferrous Site to acquire a three acre   …Continue Reading Park Profiles: Groundwork Lawrence

2014 DAR Agricultural Photo Calendar: July posted on Jul 1

2014 DAR Agricultural Photo Calendar: July

July’s Massachusetts Agriculture Calendar Photo Contest winner was Tamara Buckley-Leclerc, who photographed pickled green beans or dilly beans at  Carraig Farm in Ashby. Tamara says that dilly beans, seen in the July photo, are one of her husband’s favorites. She takes advantage of canning and freezing   …Continue Reading 2014 DAR Agricultural Photo Calendar: July

Asparagus: A Massachusetts Tradition posted on Jun 18

Asparagus: A Massachusetts Tradition

Asparagus is one of the first spring crops we harvest here in Massachusetts. It found its way to Massachusetts in the late 1700’s by way of colonist from the Netherlands who settled in West Brookfield.  In the late 19th century Concord began its agricultural focus   …Continue Reading Asparagus: A Massachusetts Tradition