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Madeleine

Madeleine Barr
Multimedia intern, Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs (EEA)
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On Tuesday, please join the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife’s chief of Hatcheries, Ken Simmons, for a discussion about Trout Stream Insects.  This talk will be especially pertinent for those interested in fly fishing and/or marine habitats.  This event will take place at the South Foxborough Community Center. 

Also, don’t forget that pre-registration is still going on for the Maple Sugarin’ event in mid-March at Breakheart Reservation in Saugus.  This will be a unique opportunity to make your own maple syrup! 

We have a little less going on this week in terms of planned activities, but that does not mean you should feel confined to your houses.  Grab a pair of binoculars and visit one of the many state parks to scout for birds that stick around New England all winter. 

Or visit a local winter farmers market and try a new recipe with some local seasonal food.   Many local farmers can continue growing root vegetables, such as beets and potatoes, throughout the winter.  Food that is grown locally is better for the environment because it does not need to travel as far nor consume as many pesticides as food grown on large-scale farms far away. 

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