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Anna Waclawiczek

Anna Waclawiczek

Chief of Staff, Department of Agricultural Resources (DAR)

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cranberries

If you love the color ruby-red you're going to love watching the harvest of New England's bounciest crimson fruit – the cranberry! Do you know how the cranberry got its name? The name cranberry derives from the Pilgrim name for the fruit, craneberry, so called because the small, pink blossoms that appear in the spring resemble the head and bill of a Sandhill crane.

The 7th Annual Cranberry Harvest Celebration, hosted by the A.D. Makepeace Company and Cape Cod Cranberry Association gets underway October 9 and 10, 2010 in Wareham, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day.

Nestled among the towns and villages of Southeastern Massachusetts are more than 14,000 acres of cranberry bogs. These bogs are the workplaces of the nearly 400 cranberry growing families of the Commonwealth. For generations they have nurtured and cultivated these wetlands, contributed to their communities, provided shelter and habitat for hundreds of plants and animal species, and helped to preserve the beautiful New England countryside. The festival offers a perfect opportunity to learn about cranberries and experience the harvest.

This fun family event features activities for children, animal shows, cooking demonstrations, food vendors, pony and wagon rides, and much more. The highlight of the day is an opportunity to witness a working cranberry bog. (Please, no pets.)

Cranberry Harvest Celebration website.

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