Post Content

Tim Purinton

Tim Purinton

Director, Department of Fish and Game’s Division of Ecological Restoration

View Tim's Bio

StreamThe Great Outdoors Blog provides inspiration to go outside to visit Massachusetts farms, parks, and ponds. For example in previous posts I have encouraged you to visit Red Brook or Green River and explore our 10,000 miles of rivers and streams. But for now, selfishly, I want you to avoid the stream I’m about to describe.

Once you find a glorious trout water, the kind that is worthy of Trout Unlimited calendar or the glossy pages of the Fly Fishing Journal you start to get anxious about others knowing your secret and unexpectedly meeting you there.

The river as it tumbles over granite is clear as London Gin. The structure of the stream is a balance of deep-dark pools and long-lazy riffles, punctuated by thick submerged logs that hide rainbows. Hemlock shades the water keeping it cool even in the early September sun. The immediate river valley is undeveloped without a house, farm or road in sight or earshot.

We all know exceptional places that we feel inclined to share and speak volumes of; other places are so special that you want to keep them for yourself. What’s surprising is that stunning natural places can still be readily found in a densely developed and populated state like Massachusetts. So I encourage you to get out and find that spot so special you want absolutely nobody else to know about it.

Written By:

Recent Posts

2014 DAR Agricultural Calendar: September posted on Sep 12

2014 DAR Agricultural Calendar: September

September’s photo contest winner was Gary Kamen, who photographed Mount Warner Vineyard in Hadley. Mount Warner Vineyards is a farm-winery located in Hadley, a small town in the beautiful Pioneer Valley. Operated by Gary and Bobbie Kamen, their philosophy is to recognize the unique characteristics of   …Continue Reading 2014 DAR Agricultural Calendar: September

Calling All Shuckers! posted on Sep 3

Calling All Shuckers!

Do you know where the oysters you ate at the raw bar last night were grown? Do you know how oysters are grown? Oysters naturally inhabited the eastern coast dating back to the 1700s, but due to over-harvesting, disease, and habitat loss, wild oysters have   …Continue Reading Calling All Shuckers!

The Turtles are Coming posted on Aug 29

The Turtles are Coming

With a migration pattern that stretches thousands of miles, it is no surprise that Massachusetts is home to four types of turtles during the summer, all of them protected by local and international law. And while you probably know that sea turtles often frequent the Massachusetts beaches, can you identify them?