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Marion Larson

Marion Larson

Outreach Coordinator, MassWildlife

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For avid anglers out there, I recently got some great news from our Chief of Hatcheries, Ken Simmons. Over 450 broodstock salmon were stocked in selected lakes and ponds across the state in late October. These big, beautiful fish weighing several pounds apiece are referred to as “retired” broodstock salmon because they can no longer produce eggs in quantity for hatchery needs. To get an idea of the size of these fish, check out the image from a stocking event earlier in 2009 with Environment Undersecretary Phil Griffiths holding one of these big beauties.

Big Broody Salmon

This particular batch of fish came from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s White River National Fish Hatchery in Vermont, a federal salmon hatchery involved in the restoration of Atlantic salmon in the Connecticut River. State fish and wildlife agencies partnering in the salmon restoration effort have an option to picking up the “retirees” and stocking them in their own state for a bonus fishing experience! We never know how many fish will be available, but it looks like another truckload or two of fish will be stocked sometime in December. For a fishing adventure this weekend or during Thanksgiving week, click here to see which lakes and ponds contain a big “broody” fish lurking in the water!

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