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Rachel Offerdahl

Rachel Offerdahl

Multimedia intern, Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs (EEA)

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The Charles River Reservation has a little something for everyone. You can walk, run, or bike the Esplanade; look for wildlife; tour the Charles River Dam; go kayaking, canoeing, rowing, or sailing; or hear a concert at the Hatch Shell. There are also athletic fields and tennis courts, exercise stations, picnic areas, playgrounds, swimming pools, and a skating rink. The park starts in Boston and stretches 20 miles through Cambridge, Watertown, Waltham, Newton, Weston, Needham, Wellesley, and Dover. The reservation offers scenic views – both urban and natural. When you visit, be courteous – keep your dog on a leash and clean up your waste.

Click on the photo to see images from my visit.

Information on park event schedules and seasonal activities.

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Recent Posts

The View from Massachusetts posted on Sep 17

The View from Massachusetts

While Massachusetts can claim significant success in urban river revitalization, dam removal, cranberry bog naturalization and stream flow restoration, globally there are daunting challenges to restore highly impacted or vanishing ecosystems that will test the acumen of ecologists, engineers and politicians for years to come.

2014 DAR Agricultural Calendar: September posted on Sep 12

2014 DAR Agricultural Calendar: September

September’s photo contest winner was Gary Kamen, who photographed Mount Warner Vineyard in Hadley. Mount Warner Vineyards is a farm-winery located in Hadley, a small town in the beautiful Pioneer Valley. Operated by Gary and Bobbie Kamen, their philosophy is to recognize the unique characteristics of   …Continue Reading 2014 DAR Agricultural Calendar: September

Calling All Shuckers! posted on Sep 3

Calling All Shuckers!

Do you know where the oysters you ate at the raw bar last night were grown? Do you know how oysters are grown? Oysters naturally inhabited the eastern coast dating back to the 1700s, but due to over-harvesting, disease, and habitat loss, wild oysters have   …Continue Reading Calling All Shuckers!