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Tim Purinton

Tim Purinton

Acting Director, Department of Fish and Game’s Division of Ecological Restoration

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Thanksgiving is around the corner and it’s got me thinking about family, friends and cranberries. Last month, I visited the site of an abandoned Plymouth cranberry bog to kick-off a project to restore the wetlands and the river that runs through it. What an amazing spot. As the Acting Director of the Division of Ecological Restoration, I get to visit some of the state’s most beautiful landscapes. It’s our job to restore the Commonwealth’s critical aquatic ecosystems, like these wetlands and rivers. Fall is a great time to get out and see these special places…and most of all fish them!

Bog Restoration

If you’re interested in seeing a completed bog restoration, visit the Lyman Reserve , a Trustees of Reservations property in Wareham and Plymouth. There you will see a former cranberry bog landscape restored with the help of A.D. Makepeace, the region’s largest cranberry grower. Today, the Red Brook there is home to “salter” brook trout and other native species.

Southeastern Massachusetts has 25,000 acres of cranberry bogs. A fraction of these bogs have been purchased or donated for wildlife conservation. Ecologists, biologists and engineers are restoring bogs that are no longer in production to provide habitat for fish and wildlife. Click here for some photos of my trip to Plymouth to visit the 40-acre Eel River restoration project.

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