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Anna Waclawiczek

Anna Waclawiczek

Chief of Staff, Department of Agricultural Resources (DAR)

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Thanks to David Webber, DAR staffer, for his contributions to this blog about winter farmers' markets! Enjoy!

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Traditionally thought of as a summertime activity, shopping at the local farmers’ market is becoming more of a year-round activity in Massachusetts, thanks to the burgeoning number of communities hosting winter farmers’ markets across the state.  With consumer demand increasing, local farmers are extending their seasons to meet the growing demand for local food, year round!

Root vegetables and storage crops such as apples, carrots, potatoes and turnips abound at the markets, along with a wide variety of other locally grown and produced foods, including, meats, cheeses, wine, poultry, fish, honey, maple products, baked goods and specialty items.

And if you are looking to create a locally grown holiday meal or find a unique gift for that someone special, several festivals and one day holiday markets are being held in addition to the 36 on-going winter farmers’ markets across the state. Here are a few:

10th Annual Thanksgiving Festival Bring Thanksgiving to your home from the North Quabbin Region. November 17 – 18, Red Apple Farm, Phillipston.

Berkshire Grown Holiday Markets Visit these holiday markets filled with local food producers and vendors of other agricultural products including locally-grown plants, bee-related products and yarns. December markets will also feature local artisans. November 17 – 18 and December 15 – 16, 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Cape Ann Thanksgiving Harvest Market You’ll find more than 20 local vendors selling produce, jams, baked goods, meats, cheeses, maple syrup, crafts and more. EBT/SNAP/WIC & Senior FM coupons accepted. November 17, 9:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. at the Gloucester Unitarian Universalist Church, 10 Church Street, Gloucester. 

4th Annual Harvest Festival & Market As part of Americas Hometown Thanksgiving Festival, Edible South Shore Magazine & Plymouth Farmers' Market bring you this holiday event where you can shop for holiday meals from a selection of locally grown produce and specialty foods, as well as locally made desserts, and buy holiday gifts from local artisans and crafters. November 18, 11 a.m. – 4 p.m. on Water Street, Plymouth.

Lexington Farmers’ Market FESTival This community tradition offers locally grown and produced items for your Thanksgiving table from some of your favorite farms and local vendors. November 20, 12 p.m. – 4 p.m. at Seasons Four, 1265 Mass Avenue, Lexington.

Carlisle Winter Faire This one day farmers’ market will host local and organic vegetables growers and specialty food producer. You will also find farm fresh eggs, cheese, meat, breads, baked good, fibers and more.  December 15, 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. at 27 School Street, Unitarian Universalist Church, Union Hall, Carlisle.

For a complete list of winter farmers’ markets and a holiday food buying guide go to www.mass.gov/massgrown.

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