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Anna Waclawiczek

Anna Waclawiczek

Chief of Staff, Department of Agricultural Resources (DAR)

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Pumpkin Photo

Pumpkin Picking Photo

The harvest season may be drawing to an end, but that does not mean that there are not still great opportunities to sample the local flavors of Massachusetts. The pumpkin season is underway, and a warm and sun filled summer has lead to a bountiful crop this fall. Mild temperatures this fall have been ideal for visitors of pick-your-own pumpkin patches, allowing for a great opportunity for parents and children to pick out the pumpkin that is just right for their home. There are over 100 pick-your-own pumpkin patches in Massachusetts. Often these farms have other outdoor activities like hay rides and corn mazes.

Pumpkins are not only Halloween decorations but they can make a nutritious tasty snack, dessert, or meal. Pumpkins have high levels of anti-oxidants, beta-carotene (which converts to vitamin A), potassium, and many other nutrients such as Vitamins C and E. If you do intend on turning your pumpkin into a Jack O’ Lantern though, try saving the seeds. Pumpkin seeds can be baked or roasted into a tasty snack, and can either be salted or seasoned any way you like.

If you are looking to go pumpkin picking but aren’t sure where in your area patches are located, check out DAR’s easy-to-use pumpkin patch finder by selecting "pumpkins" from the "crops" menu on the interactive map.

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