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Lindsey Palatino

Lindsey Palatino

Multimedia intern, Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs

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I took these photographs while exploring the Quabbin Reservoir on Jan. 20, 2010. Quabbin Reservoir – which supplies water to more than 2 million people – was built in the 1930's and is one of the largest man-made public water supplies in the United States. It was cold so there weren’t many other people around but I did spot two bald eagles. The park surrounding the reservoir is managed by the Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR) and is a great spot for hiking, bird watching, fishing, snowshoeing and biking. Click here for more information about the Quabbin Reservoir.

Quabbin Reservoir - Winter Chill Quabbin Reservoir - Winter Chill

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Recent Posts

Calling All Insect-Loving Volunteers! posted on Jul 30

Calling All Insect-Loving Volunteers!

I always thought wasps were the bad guys growing up. But smokey-winged beetle bandit wasps (Cerceris fumipennis) are actually the good guys – used to kill off an invasive species. This specific type of wasp (that does not sting) catches Emerald Ash Borer (EAB), a   …Continue Reading Calling All Insect-Loving Volunteers!

A Whale of a License Plate posted on Jul 28

A Whale of a License Plate

Wish your license plate was more identifiable? Want to save whales? Well, there is a way to achieve both of these at once. Perhaps the old saying about hitting two birds with one stone should be “do two cool things with one easy payment to the   …Continue Reading A Whale of a License Plate

Before the Boston Seafood Festival, Reconsider the Lobster posted on Jul 23

Before the Boston Seafood Festival, Reconsider the Lobster

Everything that you have been told about lobsters is a lie. Okay, maybe not everything. But despite the popularity of the lobster industry (and it’s a very popular industry—bringing in over $53 million dollars in Massachusetts alone), many popular beliefs about the lobster’s existence are   …Continue Reading Before the Boston Seafood Festival, Reconsider the Lobster