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Recipe and photos courtesy of Chef Carolyn from Carolyn’s Farm Kitchen.

Recipe and photos courtesy of Chef Carolyn from Carolyn’s Farm Kitchen.

Maple syrup is not just for putting on your pancakes! With Maple Month officially here, enjoy this delicious recipe featuring one of nature’s finest sweeteners.  This recipe is courtesy of Chef Carolyn from Carolyn’s Farm Kitchen, one of the chef instructors who has joined Appleton Cooks!, a farm-to-table cooking program sponsored by Appleton Farm in Ipswich.  This recipe was featured at the “Tap to Table’ workshop on March 8.

Yield: 4-6 servings

Batter Ingredients:

1 cup whole milk

1 large egg

2 tablespoons melted unsalted butter

1 cup all-purpose flour

2 teaspoon baking powder

2 tablespoons of sugar

½ teaspoon of kosher salt

Pear Mixture:

1 tablespoon unsalted butter

2 ripe pears, peeled and sliced

½ cup (total) Massachusetts maple syrup

2 teaspoons of lemon juice

Directions:

Preheat oven to 375º

In a small bowl whisk together the milk, egg, and melted butter.

In a larger bowl blend together the flour, baking powder, sugar, and salt.  Stir in the milk mixture and let the batter stand for at least 10 minutes.

Over high heat melt one (1) tablespoon of butter in a 10” ovenproof skillet, add the sliced pears and 2 tablespoons of maple, and sauté until the pears and syrup are caramelized, approximately

5-6 minutes (add another one (1) tablespoon of maple syrup if needed).

Remove the pan from the heat and add the lemon juice and the remaining maple syrup.  Pour the batter evenly over the pears and bake for 12 minutes. Check for doneness by inserting a toothpick in the center of the pancake, if it comes out clean, it is done.

Remove pancake from the oven and let it sit for 1 minute.  Carefully place an oversize plate (much larger than the pan you’re using) over the pan, and while holding onto both sides of the pan/plate with oven mitts, quickly invert the pancake onto the platter.  Allow all of the maple syrup to drizzle over the top.

Variations:

Any type of seasonal fruit would work well, such as summer berries, peaches, plums, apples, or even sliced bananas.  Nuts would be a great addition too, as well as adding flavored extracts to the batter.

Written By:


DAR Program Coordinator

With a background in the culinary arts, nutrition education and program development, Julia joined The Department of Agricultural Resources Division of Agricultural Markets in 2008 to help spread the word about Massachusetts’ incredible agricultural and culinary opportunities. She also coordinates several grant and marketing programs available to a diversified group of growers and agricultural associations across the Commonwealth. A Boston University graduate, she can be found in her spare time sourcing out the best local products for her next culinary creation or volunteering in the community.

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