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Rachel Offerdahl

Rachel Offerdahl

Multimedia intern, Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs (EEA)

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Looking for an outdoor activity this weekend? The Chestnut Hill Reservoir offers a dog-friendly one and a half mile loop trail for walking and jogging around its banks. The reservoir park is accessible from three of the Green Line T branches: B – Chestnut Hill Ave.; C – Cleveland Circle; D – Reservoir. From the trail you can see wildlife (ducks, geese, and rabbits), scenic views of Boston College’s campus, and Boston’s Prudential Center and Hancock Tower. The park is considered a masterpiece of urban planning and engineering and is on the National Register of Historic Places and is a city of Boston landmark. No swimming or boating is allowed on the water, but there is a rink and pool adjacent to the reservoir.

Click on the photo to see a series of images from my visit.

Information and directions.

Park history.

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